Brazilian Mechanic Invents Light In A Bottle With Water And Bleach

Brazilian Mechanic Invents Light In A Bottle With Water And BleachIn 2002, the Brazilian mechanic Alfredo Moser had a light-bulb moment and came up with a way of illuminating his house during the day without electricity – using nothing more than plastic bottles filled with water and a tiny bit of bleach. So how does it work? Simple refraction of sunlight, explains Moser.

‘Moser lamp’

“Add two capfuls of bleach to protect the water so it doesn’t turn green [with algae]. The cleaner the bottle, the better,” he adds. “You fix the bottle in with polyester resin. Even when it rains, the roof never leaks – not one drop… An engineer came and measured the light,” he says. “It depends on how strong the sun is but it’s more or less 40 to 60 watts,” he says.

The inspiration for the “Moser lamp” came to him during one of the country’s frequent electricity blackouts in 2002. Moser and his friends began to wonder how they would raise the alarm, in case of an emergency, such as a small plane coming down, imagining a situation in which they had no matches.


‘Great sense of pride’

Soon he had developed the lamp. Moser has installed the bottle lamps in neighbours’ houses and the local supermarket. While he does earn a few dollars installing them, it’s obvious from his simple house and his 1974 car that his invention hasn’t made him wealthy. What it has given him is a great sense of pride.

Illac Angelo Diaz, executive director of the MyShelter Foundation in the Philippines that specialises in alternative construction, started making the lamps in June 2011. They now train people to create and install the bottles, in order to earn a small income. In the Philippines, where a quarter of the population lives below the poverty line, and electricity is unusually expensive, the idea has really taken off, with Moser lamps now fitted in 140,000 homes.  The idea has also caught on in about 15 other countries, from India and Bangladesh, to Tanzania, Argentina and Fiji.

Do you find this bottle light invention amazing? Feel free to share your feedback with us!

Source: Gibby Zobel | BBC News

Image: 24 WPO

Pricey ‘Smart’ Toilets Vulnerable To Hacking

Pricey 'Smart' Toilets Vulnerable To HackingA luxury toilet controlled by a smartphone app is vulnerable to attack, according to security experts.

‘Hardware flaw’

Retailing for up to $5,686 (£3,821), the Satis toilet includes automatic flushing, bidet spray, music and fragrance release. The toilet, manufactured by Japanese firm Lixil, is controlled via an Android app called My Satis. But a hardware flaw means any phone with the app could activate any of the toilets, researchers say.


‘Can be activated by any phone’

The toilet uses bluetooth to receive instructions via the app, but the Pin code for every model is hardwired to be four zeros (0000), meaning that it cannot be reset and can be activated by any phone with the My Satis app, a report by Trustwave’s Spiderlabs information security experts reveals.

“An attacker could simply download the My Satis application and use it to cause the toilet to repeatedly flush, raising the water usage and therefore utility cost to its owner,” it says in its report. “Attackers could [also] cause the unit to unexpectedly open/close the lid, activate bidet or air-dry functions, causing discomfort or distress to [the] user.”

The limited range of bluetooth means that anyone wishing to carry out such an attack would need to be fairly close to the toilet itself, said security expert Graham Cluley.

How would you react if your toilet suddenly operated on its own? Should the Satis toilet be banned?

Source: Zoe Kleinman | BBC News

Image: For What It’s Worth