Health Risk Of Drying Clothes Indoors

Health Risk Of Drying Clothes IndoorsDrying laundry in the home poses a health risk to those prone to asthma, hay fever and other allergies, according to new research.  A study carried out by the Mackintosh School of Architecture found that many homes had too much moisture indoors. Up to a third of this moisture was attributed to drying laundry.

‘Dedicated drying areas’

The researchers have called on housebuilders to build dedicated drying areas into new housing to address the health concerns. A study of 100 homes by the Mackintosh Environmental Architecture Research Unit in Glasgow found 87% dried their washing indoors in colder weather. Researcher Rosalie Menon said people were not aware how much moisture this added to the air.

She said: “Going into people’s homes, we found they were drying washing in their living rooms, in their bedrooms. Some were literally decorating the house with it, but from just one load of washing two litres of water will be emitted.”


‘Lung infections’

A total of 75% of households, which were of mixed styles, had moisture levels which could lead to dust mite growth. There was also a strong association between drying laundry and mould spores. A particular mould spore known to cause lung infections in people with weakened immune systems was found in 25% of the homes sampled.

The research, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, was the first to track the implications of drying laundry passively inside the home. All of the types of housing surveyed had a lack of suitable spaces for drying clothes.

Do you often dry your laundry indoors? Tell us how this has affected your health in some way!

Source: BBC News

Image: The Independent

The Truth About Cleaning Your Sheets

No matter your relationship status, you never go to bed alone. Nestled within your sheets are countless intruders. For an explanation, we turned to Philip M. Tierno Jr., director of clinical microbiology and immunology at New York University’s Langone Medical Center.

How often should they change their sheets?

Wash sheets and pillowcases once a week, and you’ll eliminate that debris that has accumulated in the bed for that week. You’ll be safer from breathing in that material.

Debris? How can sheets possibly get that dirty?

Human skin cells become food for dust mites. That is one of the biggest problems associated with bedding. Mites accumulate, along with their feces. But there is also animal hair, dander, fungal mold, fungal spores, bodily secretions and bacteria. Also: dust, lint, fibers, particulates, insect parts, pollen, soil, sand and cosmetics.


All this stuff is yucky, but is it a health risk?

It is mainly a threat to respiratory tracts and not an infectious source. If you have allergies or asthma, this matter can exacerbate it. If you don’t have an allergy, you could develop one because you’re constantly challenged.

Is there an ideal way to wash bedding?

The water should be 130 to 150 degrees Fahrenheit, typically the washing machine’s hot-water cycle. Then dry using a hot drying cycle. That is germicidal; it actually kills and destroys a lot of vegetative material. It also kills the dust mites. For extra protection, “bleach is excellent.”

Once a week, hot water. Then I’m safe?

No. To protect the mattress, I use an impervious outer cover. If you look at a mattress, it collects debris by gravity. All kinds of things collect on it that are absorbed into its core. Without the impervious cover, your mattress is a “zoological and botanical garden,” he says.

Can you share other tips for handling and cleaning bed sheets? Feel free to type in your suggestions below!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Shelter Pop