Norwegian Swimming Champ Alexander Dale Oen Dies At 26

Norwegian swimming champion Alexander Dale Oen has died in the US, aged 26, Norway’s swimming federation says. He was found collapsed in a shower late on Monday after training in Flagstaff, Arizona, Norwegian media say. Officials said he had suffered a cardiac arrest. Emergency services arrived at the scene within minutes but were unable to revive him.

Dale Oen won gold in the 100m breaststroke at the World Championships in Shanghai in July 2011. His triumph came just days after the attack in Norway by Anders Behring Breivik which killed 77 people.

Per Rune Eknes told national broadcaster NRK that it was the blackest day in the history of Norwegian swimming. Norway’s Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg expressed his sorrow at the death of the swimmer.


Dale Oen’s last tweet on Monday, as he was coming to the end of training in the US, said: “2 days left of our camp up here in Flagstaff, then it’s back to the most beautiful city in Norway #Bergen”.

Dale Oen was born in Bergen, Norway’s second largest city, and began swimming at the age of four. He got his international breakthrough in 2005 when he came seventh in the 100m breaststroke during the World Aquatics Championships in Montreal, Canada. He won silver at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, Norway’s first Olympic swimming medal, and was considered a strong hope for this summer’s London Games.

Could the champion swimmer’s death have a large bearing on the Olympics? Share your thoughts with us!

Source: BBC News

Image: Tributes

Thousands Of Norwegians Gather To Annoy Mass Killer

Norwegians raised their voices in unison on Thursday to get under the skin of admitted mass killer Anders Behring Breivik.

An estimated 40,000 people turned out in central Oslo’s Youngstorget square to sing “Children of the Rainbow,” a Norwegian version of “My Rainbow Race,” written by American folk singer Pete Seeger. During his trial for the killings of 77 people last summer, Breivik cited the song as an example of Marxist influence on Norwegian culture. The Norwegian version of the song describes a “World where – every sister and every brother – shall live together – like small children of the rainbow,” according to a report in the Norway Post.

Breivik, whose trial in Oslo City Court began last week, boasts of being an ultranationalist who killed his victims to fight multiculturalism in Norway.


The idea for Thursday’s singing statement came from two women, Christine Bar and Lili Hjonnevag, who became upset with Breivik’s derision of the song and posted a call on social media for others to join them in singing it on the square, Views and News reported. They expected a few dozen people, the report said. But by Tuesday, 4,000 people had accepted their Facebook invitation  and then 10 times that many turned up Thursday.

Culture ministers from Sweden, Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Iceland joined in the song, the Norway Post reported. Lillebjorn Nilsen, who wrote the Norwegian version of the Seeger song, led the crowd in singing both the Norwegian and English versions, according to the News and Views report.

Do you think this gathering had an effect on Breivik? Share your thoughts with us!

Source & Image: CNN