Why You Should Steer Clear Of Socialcam On Facebook

Socialcam is a feed of user-generated videos.  Just by clicking on a Socialcam link in Facebook and accepting their app, every Socialcam video you watch from then on is shared to your Facebook friends automatically. The content is questionable, the titles of the videos are often salacious, and the images it posts in your timeline can be downright embarrassing.

Many of the videos are what the industry refers to as click-bait or link-bait: outrageously titled pieces that don’t exactly deliver what the titles imply.  To capture users’ interest, the videos are titled in a seriously provocative manner, like: “Officer vs. Gangsta Thug in Brawl,”  ”How to Steal 23 MacBook Pros, 14 iPhones, and 9 iPods In 31 Seconds,” and “Toyota Supra Drifting Unbuttons A Girl’s Shirt.”


So please, turn off social for Socialcam or choose what you share. Here’s how:

Go to Facebook and on the left hand column under apps double-click Socialcam. Once in the Socialcam app itself, in the upper right hand corner, choose Settings. Then in Settings, scroll down to “Auto Sharing” and unclick both the Facebook options. Scroll down again and hit SAVE.

One thing that troubled me about this app was that when I turned off public sharing in Socialcam on my computer but then watched a video on my mobile device, the settings reverted to make all my activity public. My workaround: go the app section of Facebook , choose settings for Socialcam and where is asks “who can see this activity” choose “Only Me”

I say watch whatever you want, but choose how you share that information — and pick apps that empower you to take control of your privacy, not those that are playing fast and loose with your reputation.

Are you a Socialcam user? Tell us what you think of this app!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Insider

Cellphone Industry Nearing Its Limits

The U.S. mobile phone industry is running out of the airwaves necessary to provide voice, text and Internet services to its customers.

The problem, known as the “spectrum crunch,” threatens to increase the number of dropped calls, slow down data speeds and raise customers’ prices. It will also whittle down the nation’s number of wireless carriers and create a deeper financial divide between those companies that have capacity and those that don’t.

Wireless spectrum — the invisible infrastructure over which all wireless transmissions travel — is a finite resource. When, exactly, we’ll hit the wall is the subject of intense debate, but almost everyone in the industry agrees that a crunch is coming. The U.S. still has a slight spectrum surplus. But at the current growth rate, the surplus turns into a deficit as early as next year, according to the Federal Communications Commission’s estimates.


The number-one biggest driver is consumers’ insatiable thirst for e-mail, apps and particularly video on their mobile devices — anywhere, anytime. Global mobile data traffic is just about doubling every year, and will continue to do so through at least 2016, according to Cisco’s Mobile Visual Networking Index, the industry’s most comprehensive annual study.

The FCC has also been working to free up more spectrum for wireless operators. Congress reached a tentative deal last week, approving voluntary auctions that would let TV broadcasters’ spectrum licenses be repurposed for wireless broadband use. But freeing up more spectrum won’t be enough to solve the problem.

The good news is that there are ways to buy time. The bad news is that none of the fixes are quick, and all are expensive. For the situation to improve, carriers — and, therefore, their customers — will have to pay more.

Source: CNN

Image: Mobile Media