Avoiding Diabetes? Try Weight Training!

Weight training helps to prevent type 2 diabetes in men, research suggests. Researchers found regular weights reduced the risk by up to a third, in the study of more than 32,000 men published in the Archives of Internal Medicine journal.

It is already well known that regular exercise can prevent the disease. But the is considered important as weights provides an alternative to aerobic exercises such as running for people who are not so mobile.

Researchers from Harvard School of Public Health in the US and the University of Southern Denmark followed the men over an 18-year period, during which time nearly 2,300 developed the condition.


They found 30 minutes of weights a day, five times a week could reduce the risk of diabetes by 34%. But they also reported that even less regular exercise – up to an hour a week – had an impact, cutting the risk by 12%. Nonetheless, aerobic exercise was still found to be slightly better with regular activity halving the risk. The two combined had the greatest effect, reducing it by up to 59%, the study found.

It is not clear if the same results would be found with women.

Are you willing to commit to regular weight training if it means reducing your diabetes risk effectively? Or would you rather opt for some aerobic exercises? Tell us how you maintain a healthy lifestyle!

Source: BBC News

Image: Steady Health

Sitting Too Much May Decrease Longevity

New research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine shows that people who spend a lot of time sitting may be up to 40% more likely to die from any cause, compared to people who don’t sit as long.

Compared to people who spent less than four hours per day sitting, the odds of dying were:

  • 15% higher for people who sat for at least eight hours
  • 40% higher for people who sat for 11 or more hours a day

“Our findings add to the mounting evidence that public health programs should focus not just on increasing population physical activity levels, but also on reducing sitting time,” the researchers write.

Alpa V. Patel, PhD, has published studies on the health risks associated with too much sitting. She is an epidemiologist at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta. “We are continuing to demonstrate time and time again in different populations that there is something real to the association between sitting time and reduced longevity.”


What’s so bad about sitting for long periods? That’s not totally clear. But exercise and movement do have a positive effect on blood fats called triglycerides and other heart risks, and improves blood pressure, Patel says. Her advice: Sit for five fewer minutes per hour. “Small changes can have a big impact,” she says.

The new study doesn’t prove that sitting killed people. It’s not clear which came first — poorer health or spending more time in a chair. Still, there is no doubt that being active is healthy. “The key is to do something you like to do, whether it’s sports, going to the gym, walking, or gardening. “If it is terribly unenjoyable, the likelihood of sustaining it is pretty low.”

Source: Web MD

Image: Alternavox