Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Reunited After 7 Weeks

He’s back! The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have been reunited – after being apart for seven weeks – when he returned from duty in the remote south Atlantic.

Early Wednesday morning, William, 29, flew back from the Falkland Islands to Britain with the rest of his Royal Air Force Search and Rescue helicopter crew. Kate, 30, met him at the airbase.

“The Duke of Cambridge returned to the U.K. this morning following completion of a routine operational deployment in the Falkland Islands as part of a four man Search and Rescue crew. He will now have a brief period of leave before resuming Search and Rescue duties from RAF Valley shortly,” said an official statement.


Now that they’re back together, Kate and William will be at their cottage at Kensington Palace. He will also see members of his family, such as grandmother Queen Elizabeth, and no doubt re-bond with puppy Lupo. It is anticipated that William will have several days off, which the couple “will spend privately,” a spokesman says. Kate is not expected to be undertaking any public engagements for several weeks.

William will next have to report for duty at his airbase in Anglesey, North Wales.

Source: People

Image: Day Life

Previously Unknown ‘Lost World’ Discovered in Antarctica

Communities of species previously unknown to science have been discovered on the seafloor near Antarctica, clustered in the hot, dark environment surrounding hydrothermal vents.

“Hydrothermal vents are home to animals found nowhere else on the planet that get their energy not from the Sun but from breaking down chemicals, such as hydrogen sulphide,” said Professor Alex Rogers of Oxford University’s Department of Zoology, who led the research. “The first survey of these particular vents, in the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, has revealed a hot, dark, ‘lost world’ in which whole communities of previously unknown marine organisms thrive.”

 In the “hadal” zone, which at 11,000 meters is deeper than Mount Everest is high – the pressure rises to 1,000 bar, or a ton per square centimeter. And as there is practically no light, and plants cannot grow, there is little food. It offers a glimpse of what life on Jupiter’s moon, Europa, might look like.For the first time, researchers led by the University of Oxford, University of Southampton and British Antarctic Survey, used a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) to explore the East Scotia Ridge deep beneath the Southern Ocean, where hydrothermal vents, including ‘black smokers’ reaching temperatures of up to 382 degrees Celsius, create a unique environment that lacks sunlight, but is rich in certain chemicals.

“What we didn’t find is almost as surprising as what we did,” said Professor Rogers. “Many animals such as tubeworms, vent mussels, vent crabs, and vent shrimps, found in hydrothermal vents in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans, simply weren’t there.”

The team reports its findings in this week’s issue of the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology.

 

Source and Image: The Daily Galaxy