U.S. Gov’t Clarifies: We Have No Evidence Of Mermaids

There is no evidence that mermaids exist, a US government scientific agency has said. The National Ocean Service made the unusual declaration in response to public inquiries following a TV show on the mythical creatures.

It is thought some viewers may have mistaken the programme for a documentary. “No evidence of aquatic humanoids has ever been found,” the service wrote in an online post.

The National Ocean Service posted an article last week on its educational website, Ocean Facts. Images and tales of mermaids – half-human, half-fish – appear in mythology and art from across the world and through history, from Homer’s Odyssey to the oral lore of the Australian aboriginals, the service wrote.


The article was written from publicly available sources because “we don’t have a mermaid science programme”, National Ocean Service spokeswoman Carol Kavanagh told the BBC. The programme was a work of fiction but its wink-and-nod format apparently led some viewers to believe it was a science education show, the Discovery Channel has acknowledged.

Have you ever seen a mermaid or do you know someone who has? Do you believe that mermaids really exist or not? Tell us your opinion about these popular mythical creatures!

Source: BBC News

Image: China Daily Show

U.K. Admits Spying on Russia Using Fake Rock

Britain has admitted for the first time that it was caught spying when Russia exposed its use of a fake rock in Moscow to conceal electronic equipment. Russia made the allegations in January 2006, but Britain has not publicly accepted the claims to date until now.

Jonathan Powell, then Prime Minister Tony Blair’s chief of staff, told a BBC documentary it was “embarrassing”, but “they had us bang to rights”. He added: “Clearly they had known about it for some time.” They had been “saving it up for a political purpose”, he said.

The story was first aired on Russian television, which ran reports that show how the rock contained electronic equipment and had been used by British diplomats to receive and transmit information. It showed a video of a man walking along the pavement of a Moscow street, slowing his pace, glancing at a rock and slowing down, then picking up his pace. Next the camera films another man, who walks by and picks up the rock. The Russian security service, the FSB, linked the rock with allegations that British security services were making covert payments to pro-democracy and human rights groups.

Shortly afterwards, then President Vladimir Putin introduced a law restricting non-governmental organisations (NGOs) from getting funding from foreign governments. Many closed down as a result. One human rights group that contests this claim has been accused of receiving secret payments and took the FSB to court for slander but lost.

 

Source: BBC News

Image: The Phora