Hope Solo Tests Positive For Prohibited Substance

Soccer star Hope Solo has tested positive for the diuretic Canrenone, a banned substance, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said Monday.

The 30-year-old goalkeeper on the United States team accepted a public warning and says the positive test was purely an accident, NBC reports. She will not be prohibited from competing in the Olympic Games in London later this month.

“I took a medication prescribed by my personal doctor for pre-menstrual purposes that I did not know contained a diuretic,” she said in a statement through U.S. Soccer.


“Once informed of this fact, I immediately cooperated with USADA and shared with them everything they needed to properly conclude that I made an honest mistake, and that the medication did not enhance my performance in any way,” she said.  U.S. Soccer supported Solo and released a similar statement.

The goalkeeper took home a gold medal from the 2008 Beijing Olympics, danced her way to the semi-finals with Maksim Chmerkovskiy on Dancing with the Stars and bared (almost) all in last year’s ESPN Body Issue.

What is your opinion about professional players taking prohibited or banned substances unknowingly? Should the USADA create stricter guidelines about this issue? Feel free to share your thoughts and opinions in the comment box below!

Source: People

Image: Bleacher Report

Bikinis No Longer Required in Women’s Olympic Beach Volleyball

Women beach volleyball players won’t have to wear bikinis at the 2012 London Olympics. A new rule announced on Tuesday says that participants in this summer’s beach volleyball competition can now wear shorts and sleeved tops. This new rule comes as good news for other countries wanting to participate in this event.

Athletes in the volleyball event have exclusively worn bikinis since the sport was introduced at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. Competitors could also wear bodysuits in cold-weather events. The important change was made to reflect cultural conventions of various participating countries.

“Shorts of a maximum length of [1.18 inches] above the knee, and sleeved or sleeveless tops,” will now be allowed, according to the new IOC ruling.


Since the Beijing Olympics, most beach volleyball competitions have changed rules to allow for more modest uniforms. It is an attempt to broaden the diversity in the sport, which tends to be dominated by athletes from Europe, Brazil and the United States. Allowing shorts and shirts can encourage participation from other countries with more modest cultural beliefs.

As the AP reports, the field at London’s beach volleyball competition won’t be dictated by world rankings, as in Olympics past. Qualifying tournaments on various continents will fill the 24-team draw.

Source: Yahoo News

Image: 98.1 CHFI