Brazilian Mechanic Invents Light In A Bottle With Water And Bleach

Brazilian Mechanic Invents Light In A Bottle With Water And BleachIn 2002, the Brazilian mechanic Alfredo Moser had a light-bulb moment and came up with a way of illuminating his house during the day without electricity – using nothing more than plastic bottles filled with water and a tiny bit of bleach. So how does it work? Simple refraction of sunlight, explains Moser.

‘Moser lamp’

“Add two capfuls of bleach to protect the water so it doesn’t turn green [with algae]. The cleaner the bottle, the better,” he adds. ”You fix the bottle in with polyester resin. Even when it rains, the roof never leaks – not one drop… An engineer came and measured the light,” he says. “It depends on how strong the sun is but it’s more or less 40 to 60 watts,” he says.

The inspiration for the “Moser lamp” came to him during one of the country’s frequent electricity blackouts in 2002. Moser and his friends began to wonder how they would raise the alarm, in case of an emergency, such as a small plane coming down, imagining a situation in which they had no matches.


‘Great sense of pride’

Soon he had developed the lamp. Moser has installed the bottle lamps in neighbours’ houses and the local supermarket. While he does earn a few dollars installing them, it’s obvious from his simple house and his 1974 car that his invention hasn’t made him wealthy. What it has given him is a great sense of pride.

Illac Angelo Diaz, executive director of the MyShelter Foundation in the Philippines that specialises in alternative construction, started making the lamps in June 2011. They now train people to create and install the bottles, in order to earn a small income. In the Philippines, where a quarter of the population lives below the poverty line, and electricity is unusually expensive, the idea has really taken off, with Moser lamps now fitted in 140,000 homes.  The idea has also caught on in about 15 other countries, from India and Bangladesh, to Tanzania, Argentina and Fiji.

Do you find this bottle light invention amazing? Feel free to share your feedback with us!

Source: Gibby Zobel | BBC News

Image: 24 WPO

The Truth About Cleaning Your Sheets

No matter your relationship status, you never go to bed alone. Nestled within your sheets are countless intruders. For an explanation, we turned to Philip M. Tierno Jr., director of clinical microbiology and immunology at New York University’s Langone Medical Center.

How often should they change their sheets?

Wash sheets and pillowcases once a week, and you’ll eliminate that debris that has accumulated in the bed for that week. You’ll be safer from breathing in that material.

Debris? How can sheets possibly get that dirty?

Human skin cells become food for dust mites. That is one of the biggest problems associated with bedding. Mites accumulate, along with their feces. But there is also animal hair, dander, fungal mold, fungal spores, bodily secretions and bacteria. Also: dust, lint, fibers, particulates, insect parts, pollen, soil, sand and cosmetics.


All this stuff is yucky, but is it a health risk?

It is mainly a threat to respiratory tracts and not an infectious source. If you have allergies or asthma, this matter can exacerbate it. If you don’t have an allergy, you could develop one because you’re constantly challenged.

Is there an ideal way to wash bedding?

The water should be 130 to 150 degrees Fahrenheit, typically the washing machine’s hot-water cycle. Then dry using a hot drying cycle. That is germicidal; it actually kills and destroys a lot of vegetative material. It also kills the dust mites. For extra protection, “bleach is excellent.”

Once a week, hot water. Then I’m safe?

No. To protect the mattress, I use an impervious outer cover. If you look at a mattress, it collects debris by gravity. All kinds of things collect on it that are absorbed into its core. Without the impervious cover, your mattress is a “zoological and botanical garden,” he says.

Can you share other tips for handling and cleaning bed sheets? Feel free to type in your suggestions below!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Shelter Pop