Ancient Egyptian Statue Mysteriously Spins On Its Own

Ancient Egyptian Statue Mysteriously Spins On Its OwnThe museum officials were stumped. A statue is supposed to stand still, not rotate all by itself. But this one at the Manchester Museum seemed to have done just that. Turned around 180 degrees — revealing an inscription on its back asking for beer.

‘Prayer for the deceased’

Statuette no. 9325 doesn’t appear to go by any proper name. It’s a prefabricated figure — an off-the-shelf product — that was placed into a small tomb around 1800 B.C. A private collector in Britain donated it to the museum in 1933. The inscription on the back, requesting a sacrifice of beer, bread and animals, was a standard prayer for the deceased.


‘Only moved during the day’

For decades, the figurine stood perfectly still — until museum workers moved its case a few feet from its original position. In February, curator Campbell Price noticed something curious was afoot. The statue seemed to have slightly turned. When he looked next, it was facing another direction. A day later, another. The turns were subtle. But at the end of each day, you could tell the statue was angled differently.

In April, museum officials installed a time-lapse camera that snapped an image of the statue every minute of every day for a week. When they ran the images in fast motion, they came across a surprising revelation: the statue only moved during the day, when visitors were walking past. It seemed, Price wrote, that vibrations caused by foot traffic in room was the culprit.

Do you find this statue movement mysterious or not? What other factors could have contributed to this occurrence?

Source: Ben Brumfield | CNN

Image: Peta Pixel

Severe Global Crisis Looms For 2013

Prediction: 2013 will be a year of serious global crisis. That crisis is predictable, and in fact has already begun. The crisis originates in this summer’s extreme weather.

Almost 80% of the continental United States experienced drought conditions. Russia and Australia experienced drought as well. The drought has ruined key crops. The corn harvest is expected to drop to the lowest level since 1995. In just July, prices for corn and wheat jumped about 25% each, prices for soybeans about 17%. These higher grain prices will flow through to higher food prices. For consumers in developed countries, higher food prices are a burden — but in almost all cases, a manageable burden. But step outside the developed world, and the price of food suddenly becomes the single most important fact of human economic life. In poor countries, people typically spend half their incomes on food — and by “food,” they mean first and foremost bread.

When grain prices spiked in 2007-2008, bread riots shook 30 countries across the developing world, from Haiti to Bangladesh, according to the Financial Times.   A drought in Russia in 2010 forced suspension of Russian grain exports that year and set in motion the so-called Arab spring.


And if food prices surge again? China is especially vulnerable to food cost inflation. In just one month, July 2011, the cost of living jumped 6.5%. Inflation happily subsided over the course of 2012. Springtime hopes for a bumper U.S. grain crop in 2012 enabled the Chinese central bank to ease credit in the earlier part of the summer. Now the Chinese authorities will face some tough choices over what to do next.

The Arab Spring of 2011 is sometimes compared to the revolutions of 1848. That’s apter than people realize: the “hungry ’40s” were years of bad harvests across Europe. Hungry people are angry people, and angry people bring governments down.

Are you ready for the global crisis that may befall us next year? Do you think it will cause more uprisings? Share your thoughts and opinions with us!

Source: CNN

Image: The Daily Beast