Walking — The Easiest Way To Extend Life

Did you know that every minute you walk can extend your life by 1.5 to 2 minutes? In addition, many studies show that people who walk regularly live longer, weigh less, have lower blood pressure, and enjoy better overall health than non-walkers. Here’s a look at five benefits of walking.

Walking Increases Your Lifespan

Walking more than an hour a day improves life expectancy significantly, a 2011 study showed. The researchers looked at 27,738 participants between the ages of 40 and 79 over a 13-year period. Surprisingly, their lifetime medical costs did not increase—even though they lived longer.

Walking Keeps Your Mind Sharp

Walking 72 blocks a week (around six to nine miles) helps increase grey matter, which in turn lowers the risk of suffering from cognitive impairment—or trouble with concentration, memory and thought, according to a study which looked at 299 seniors over a nine-year period.


Walking Helps Lower Blood Pressure

Walking just 30 minutes a day, three to five days a week—even when the 30 minutes are broken into three ten-minute increments—has been found to significantly lower blood pressure.

Walking Improves Your Mood

Just thirty minutes on a treadmill reduces feelings of tension and depression, according toresearch published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. In fact, the study found that walking lifted moods more quickly than anti-depressants did (and with fewer side effects).

Walking Improves Insomnia

Try taking a brisk 45-minute walk in the morning five days a week, and your sleep may improve significantly, according to research from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, which looked at women from the age of 50-74.

How often do you take brisk walks? What other health benefits can one get from walking? Do share your thoughts and opinions on this topic!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Insiders Health

Sedentary Lifestyle As Deadly As Smoking

A lack of exercise is now causing as many deaths as smoking across the world, a study suggests.

The , published in the Lancet to coincide with the build-up to the Olympics, estimates that about a third of adults are not doing enough physical activity, causing 5.3m deaths a year. That equates to about one in 10 deaths from diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and breast and colon cancer.

Researchers said the problem was now so bad it should be treated as a pandemic. And they said tackling it required a new way of thinking, suggesting the public needed to be warned about the dangers of inactivity rather than just reminded of the benefits of being active. The team of 33 researchers drawn from centres across the world also said governments needed to look at ways to make physical activity more convenient, affordable and safer. It is recommended that adults do 150 minutes of moderate exercise, such as brisk walking, cycling or gardening, each week.


The Lancet study found people in higher income countries were the least active with those in the UK among the worst, as nearly two-thirds of adults were judged not to be doing enough. The researchers admitted comparisons between countries were difficult because the way activity was estimated may have differed from place to place. Nonetheless, they said they remained confident that their overall conclusion was valid.

But others questioned equating smoking with inactivity. While smoking and inactivity kill a similar number of people, smoking rates are much lower than the number of inactive people, making smoking more risky to the individual.

How sedentary or how active is your lifestyle today? Do you take time to check on your health or to make sure that you do not live an inactive lifestyle?

Source: BBC News

Image: Helina Min