The Truth Behind Pope Francis’ Statement About Gays

The Truth Behind Pope Francis' Statement About GaysThe press conference on Pope Francis’ plane traveling from Brazil back to the Vatican was fascinating. But, unfortunately, if you were reading the headlines from some media outlets, you would have learned just one thing. As the Huffington Post put it: “Breakthrough: Pope OK with Gays.” This is the worst coverage of a religious story I have seen to date.

‘Homosexual priests’

What Pope Francis really said, in response to a reporter’s question about homosexual priests who are living a celibate life was this:

“If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?”


‘Deserve the same kindness’

Pope Francis simply and compassionately reiterated Biblical teaching. The Bible and the Catholic Church have never taught that it is a “sin” to be homosexual.  They teach it is a sin to have homosexual sex because it goes against the laws of God’s nature, specifically his plan for human sexuality.

When Pope Francis says “who am I to judge” he is saying—and I think we need to hear more of this from religious leaders—that active homosexuals deserve the same kindness, love, and mercy that all of us sinners would hope to receive from God and from others.  We don’t make judgments about anyone’s personal worth—God has already done that when he created us out of love.

What is your reaction to this explanation? And what is your opinion regarding Pope Francis’ statement about gays?

Source: Fr. Jonathan Morris | Fox News

Image: Christian Today

Pope Benedict XVI Announces Resignation

Pope Benedict XVI Announces ResignationPope Benedict XVI is to resign at the end of this month after nearly eight years as the head of the Catholic Church, saying he is too old to continue at the age of 85. The unexpected development – the first papal resignation in nearly 600 years – surprised governments, Vatican-watchers and even his closest aides. The Vatican says it expects a new Pope to be elected before Easter.

‘Advised by his doctor’

The brother of the German-born Pope said the pontiff had been advised by his doctor not to take any more transatlantic trips and had been considering stepping down for months. Speaking to the BBC from his home in Regensburg in Germany, Georg Ratzinger said his brother’s resignation was part of a “natural process”. There would be no interference in choosing a successor, Georg Ratzinger said:

“Where he’s needed he will make himself available, but he will not want to want to intervene in the affairs of his successor.”

The next Pope will be chosen by members of a 117-strong nominating conclave held in the Sistine Chapel at the Vatican. Analysts say Europeans – and Italian-speakers specifically – are still among the favourites, but strong candidates could emerge from Africa and Latin America, which both have very large Catholic populations.


‘No longer suited’

In a statement, the pontiff said: “After having repeatedly examined my conscience before God, I have come to the certainty that my strengths, due to an advanced age, are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the Petrine ministry. I am well aware that this ministry, due to its essential spiritual nature, must be carried out not only with words and deeds, but no less with prayer and suffering…”

A theological conservative before and during his time as Pope, he has taken traditional positions on homosexuality and women priests, while urging abstinence instead of blessing the use of contraceptives.

Were you also surprised by Pope Benedict XVI’s sudden resignation? Who do you think will be the next Pope?

Source: BBC News

Image: The New York Times