Dawn Loggins: From Janitor To Ivy League

Dawn Loggins was homeless at the start of the school year, abandoned by her drug-abusing parents. She got a janitorial job through a school workforce assistance program. She’s grateful for the work. But it’s where she’s going next, beyond the walls of Burns High School, that excites her most.

Dawn grew up in a ramshackle home with no electricity and no running water. She often went days, even weeks without showering. She and her brother Shane — who was equally studious in his schoolwork — would walk 20 minutes to a public park to fetch water. Burns High was their fourth high school since middle school, as they moved from town to town. Shane was outgoing, but Dawn always appeared more reserved.

For a while, Dawn lived on the odd couch at friends’ homes, while she figured out what to do. Sometimes, she slept on the floor. The only thing that was clear was that she wanted to in Lawndale, where she was active in extracurricular activities, had a boyfriend and had a job. With her parents gone, she processed the options with her guidance counselor, who helped her find a new home and process her college applications.


Dawn applied to four colleges within the state: the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; North Carolina State University; Davidson College; and Warren Wilson College. In December, she sent one final application off in the mail, to her reach-for-the-stars choice, Harvard. Months passed. She was accepted to the four schools in North Carolina. And finally, she received an acceptance letter from Harvard! In addition to that, she was offered tuition, room and board, as well as assistance finding an on-campus job.

Dawn has learned the sort of lessons that can’t be learned in school. “I love my parents. I disagree with the choices that they’ve made. But we all have to live with the consequences of our actions,” she said. She takes it all in stride. “If I had not had those experiences, I wouldn’t be such a strong-willed or determined person.”

She might just find Harvard to be easy, don’t you think? Did Dawn Loggins’ story inspire you? Share your thoughts with us!

Source: CNN

Image: Patheos

Gender Nonconformity Increases Kids’ Risk for Abuse

Kids who tend to make choices that are not considered typical for their gender are at higher risk of being abused by their parents or other family members, and are at risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This is the main finding of a study that will appear in the March 2012 issue of Pediatrics.

An anxiety disorder that develops after witnessing or surviving a traumatic event, such as physical or sexual abuse, PTSD symptoms may include vivid flashbacks, edginess, and sleeping problems. PTSD has been linked to risky behaviors such as unprotected sex, substance abuse, and physical symptoms such as chronic pain. Exactly why these kids are at increased risk for abuse and PTSD is not fully understood.


“Parents may be uncomfortable with their child’s gender expression and may think that parenting can change behaviors, so they may become harsher,” study author Andrea Roberts says. “Some parents think kids who are non-conforming will grow up to be a gay or lesbian, and if they are not comfortable with this, they may think they can change a kid’s future.”

‘The common perception that they are or will be homosexual is not accurate … most are not,” Roberts tells WebMD.

Her advice is clear: “Accept your children and let go of how you thought things were going to be,” she says.

Source: Web MD

Image: Time