Teen Jailed For Giving The Judge The Finger

Teen Jailed For Giving The Judge The FingerA Miami woman facing drug charges made her situation much worse when she laughed at and then flipped off the man with the gavel. File this case under: Ill advised.

‘Raised the bond’

According to NBC Miami, 18-year-old Penelope Soto was in court for charges relating to possession of Xanax, a prescription drug. Judge Jorge Rodriguez-Chomat was in the process of setting her bond. He asked Soto about the value of her jewelry. Soto laughed. That was strike one.

The perplexed judge asked if Soto had taken drugs within the past 24 hours, to which she answered, “Actually, no.” The judge then set Soto’s bond at $5,000 and said, “Bye-bye.” Soto chuckled and said, “Adios.” Strike two. The judge summoned her back and raised the bond to $10,000, eliciting gasps from those in the courtroom.


‘Contempt of court’

Soto asked if the judge was serious. Judges are not known for their humor, and Rodriguez-Chomat is no exception. “I am serious,” he said. “Adios.”

But Soto wasn’t done. Instead of leaving the courtroom she flipped Rodriguez-Chomat the bird and said “F*** you.” And that was strike three. Soto was again called back and then sentenced to thirty days in the big house for contempt of court.

Do you think Penelope Soto deserved the additional bond and punishment for making fun of Judge Jorge Rodriguez-Chomat? Would you have done the same if you were the judge? Feel free to comment on this situation!

Source: Mike Krumboltz, Yahoo News

Image: Fox News

Cancer Survivor Jailed Over Medical Bill She Didn’t Owe

How did breast cancer survivor Lisa Lindsay end up behind bars? She didn’t pay a medical bill — one the Herrin, Ill., teaching assistant was told she didn’t owe.

“She got a $280 medical bill in error and was told she didn’t have to pay it,” The Associated Press reports. “But the bill was turned over to a collection agency, and eventually state troopers showed up at her home and took her to jail in handcuffs.”

Although the U.S. abolished debtors’ prisons in the 1830s, more than a third of U.S. states allow the police to haul people in who don’t pay all manner of debts, from bills for health care services to card and auto loans. Under the law, debtors aren’t arrested for nonpayment, but rather for failing to respond to court hearings, pay legal fines, or otherwise showing “contempt of court” in connection with a creditor lawsuit.


According to the ACLU: “The sad truth is that debtors’ prisons are flourishing today, more than two decades after the Supreme Court prohibited imprisoning those who are too poor to pay their legal debts. In this era of shrinking budgets, state and local governments have turned aggressively to using the threat and reality of imprisonment to squeeze revenue out of the poorest defendants who appear in their courts.”

Such practices, heightened in recent years by the effects of the recession, amount to criminalizing poverty, say critics in urging federal authorities to intervene. “More people are unemployed, more people are struggling financially, and more creditors are trying to get their debt paid,” Madigan told the AP.

Do you think debtors’ prisons should be abolished for good? Share your opinions with us!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: NY Daily News