Facebook: ‘Copyright’ Warning Is A Hoax!

Facebook 'Copyright' Warning Is A Hoax“In response to the new Facebook guidelines, I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, comics, paintings, professional photos and videos, etc. (as a result of the Berner Convention). For commercial use of the above my written consent is needed at all times!”

‘No such thing’

It’s a frightful message and those worried that Facebook will own their photos or other media are posting it — unaware that it is a hoax. Here’s the truth: Facebook doesn’t own your media and there is no such thing as the Berner Convention. (There is a Berne Convention!)

“We have noticed some statements that suggest otherwise and we wanted to take a moment to remind you of the facts — when you post things like photos to Facebook, we do not own them,” Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes said in a statement. “Under our terms (https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms), you grant Facebook permission to use, distribute, and share the things you post, subject to the terms and applicable privacy settings.”


‘Don’t bother posting’

Brad Shear, a Washington-area attorney and blogger who is an expert on social media, said the message was “misleading and not true.” He said that when you agree to Facebook’s terms of use you provide Facebook a “non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any content you post. You do not need to make any declarations about copyright issues since the law already protects you.  The privacy declaration [in this message] is worthless and does not mean anything.”

Bottom line? Don’t bother copying, pasting, and posting. It was a hoax before and is still a hoax now.

Have you fallen prey to these “copyright” hoaxes on Facebook before? Tell us about other forms this hoax that you know of!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Raw Signal

Apple Blocking Nexus Sales To Make Way For iPhone5?

As you might have heard, Apple is claiming that the new Nexus phone from Samsung and Google infringes on some of its copyrights. Specifically, the way that Google’s Jelly Bean OS displays search results on one screen, pulling the information in from multiple sources. Doesn’t make sense to me, either.

Samsung is fighting back of course, and asked the judge in the case to lift the ban on the sale of the Nexus in the U.S., but was rejected. The iPhone 5 will be coming out soon, and I have no doubt that it will once again reinvent the way we think about mobile phones, just like the first one did. After the next iteration of the phone comes from Apple, I’m sure that companies like Google and Samsung will again go to the old drawing board to come up with their next version.


I see this whole copyright case as nothing more than an expensive game of block-and-tackle, though. Apple gets to block the release of one of the best, if not the best, phone and OS combinations, and gets to release its next-gen version with a clear runway. It’s business, but it sucks for consumers. If the Nexus did catch on with some people, it would most definitely cause some disruption in Apple’s plans, which is what competition is all about. Instead, sending this all to a court for litigation limits everyone else’s opportunity to truly innovate.

If Apple wants to protect its IP, that’s fine, and that’s America. If Apple wants to be the best, it should just focus on making the best, and let the consumers decide.

Let the battle of the smartphones begin anew! Do you agree that the more Nexus is banned, the more people want to have it? Which brand do you prefer — Apple or Samsung?

Source: Digg

Image: Phillihp’s Tech Blog