4 Cruelest Foods We Enjoy Eating

When you trace the origins of each ingredient of your food, some uncomfortable truths emerge. Join us as we check in with the 4 Cruelest Foods You Eat.

1. Lobster

These spiny guys can live as old as we do, but thanks to our appetite for lobster rolls, they usually don’t. A recent study in the journal Animal Behavior showed that, contrary to previous thinking, lobsters and crab can feel pain and exhibit signs of stress. Some high-end restaurants even offer live lobster sashimi, where you choose your lobster from a tank and it appears on your plate in seconds, slit down the middle and squirming.

2. Shark-fin soup

This soup is made with fins that are sliced off sharks in open waters. The fish are then tossed back into the water, where they can drown or bleed to death. More status symbol than tasty (or nutritious), shark-fin soup is a popular gourmet treat in Asia and is abundant in restaurants across the United States, too.


3. Foie gras

Foie gras, which means “fatty liver” in French, is a silky-smooth delicacy from goose or duck that’s often served in elegant, high-end restaurants. Workers restrain the birds and insert a long metal tube down its throat, through which they pump pounds of corn several times a day. After about a month of force-feeding, they’re slaughtered, and their livers become your dinner.

4. Balut

Balut is a soft-boiled duck egg, where the embryo is almost fully formed–feathers, bones, and all. The egg is cracked open, the soupy liquid drunk, and the fetus dug out to eat. It’s popular in the Philippines, Laos, and other Southeast Asian countries.

Do you like eating any of these delicacies? Would you consider going vegetarian? Share your thoughts on these food facts!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Mem Rise

New Purple Crab Species Found In The Philippines

Four new species of crab have been discovered in the Philippine island of Palawan. And one of the crabs truly stands out with its unusually bright purple shell.

National Geographic reports that the Insulamon palawanese may use its uniquely colored shell to help identify its own kind: ”It is known that crabs can discriminate colours. Therefore, it seems likely that the colouration has a signal function for the social behaviour, e.g. mating,” Hendrik Freitag of the Senckenberg Museum of Zoology in Dresden, Germany told AFP.


“The particular violet coloration might just have evolved by chance, and must not necessarily have a very specific function or reason aside from being a general visual signal for recognition,” Freitag told National Geographic. Freitag’s report on the new species of crabs was published in the Raffles Bulletin of Zoology.

Despite the big news, the newly discovered crabs are quite small in stature, each from about an inch to two inches wide.  Freitag said the purple crabs likely have several natural predators, including some humans in remote areas. But he said the greatest threat to the species is ongoing forest clearing for farming, mining and home building.

What do you think should be done to help preserve these newly discovered crab species? Share your bright ideas with us!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: The Huffington Post