Full Moon Linked To Sleep Pattern Disturbance

Full Moon Linked To Sleep Pattern DisturbanceA full Moon can disturb a good night’s sleep, scientists believe. Researchers found evidence of a “lunar influence” in a study of 33 volunteers sleeping in tightly controlled laboratory conditions.

‘Poorer quality sleep’

When the Moon was round, the volunteers took longer to nod off and had poorer quality sleep, despite being shut in a darkened room, Current Biology reports. They also had a dip in levels of a hormone called melatonin that is linked to natural-body clock cycles.

When it is dark, the body makes more melatonin. And it produces less when it is light. Being exposed to bright lights in the evening or too little light during the day can disrupt the body’s normal melatonin cycles. But the work in Current Biology, by Prof Christian Cajochen and colleagues from Basel University in Switzerland, suggests the Moon’s effects may be unrelated to its brightness.


‘Lunar effect’

The volunteers were unaware of the purpose of the study and could not see the Moon from their beds in the researchers’ sleep lab. They each spent two separate nights at the lab under close observation. Findings revealed that around the full Moon, brain activity related to deep sleep dropped by nearly a third. Melatonin levels also dipped. The volunteers also took five minutes longer to fall asleep and slept for 20 minutes less when there was a full Moon.

Some people may be exquisitely sensitive to the Moon, say the researchers. Their study did not originally set out to investigate a lunar effect.

Do you experience disturbance in your sleep pattern during Full Moon? What do you think is the reason behind this?

Source: Michelle Roberts | BBC News

Image: An Inspired Life

FDA: Temporary Tattoos Can Cause Permanent Damage

FDA Temporary Tattoos Can Cause Permanent DamageIf you want to show off some cool body art over spring break, but you’re not willing to have it permanently etched onto your arm, realistic-looking temporary tattoos seem like a healthy compromise. But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday warned people to watch out. Apparently, certain temporary tattoos can still cause permanent damage.

‘Skin reactions’

The FDA’s warning has to do with temporary tattoos made with “black henna” ink containing para-phenylenediamine (PPD), a coal-tar product that is approved for use in hair dye but is known to cause skin reactions in some people. Traditional, reddish-brown henna and stick-on temporary tattoos (the ones that look like stickers and are applied with water) are not part of the warning.

Unlike permanent tattoos, in which ink is injected under the skin, “black henna” tattoos are drawn or stenciled onto the skin’s surface. They’re popular with vendors at beaches, boardwalks, resorts, and fairs because they’re easy to apply quickly and make for long-lasting, dark, realistic-looking temporary body art.


‘Permanent scarring’

But PPD can also have horrible side effects. The FDA has received reports of “redness, blisters, raised red weeping lesions, loss of pigmentation, increased sensitivity to sunlight, and even permanent scarring” in adults and children who have had “black henna” applied to their skin. Reactions can occur right away, a few days after exposure, or even as long as two or three weeks after the temporary tattoo was applied.

There are several ways to tell whether a temporary tattoo artist is using PPD instead of actual henna. According to Catherine Cartwright-Jones, who runs The Henna Page, “If the stuff they’re using is jet black and stains your skin quickly, it’s probably PPD-based black hair dye.”

Have you had any complications with a temporary tattoo? Would you prefer henna over permanent tats?

Source: Lylah M. Alphonse, Yahoo Shine

Image: The Telegraph