Hunter Mahan Drops Out Of Canadian Open After Wife Goes Into Labor

Hunter Mahan Drops Out Of Canadian Open After Wife Goes Into LaborAccording to National Post columnist Scott Stinson via Twitter on Saturday, golf star Hunter Mahan withdrew from the RBC Canadian Open shortly after his wife went into labor.

‘What’s important in life’

Hunter Mahan took to Twitter this afternoon to announce the birth of his daughter and thank fans for their support:

“What a whirlwind of a day, but I’m happy to announce the birth of my daughter Zoe Olivia Mahan born at 3:26 am. Thanks for all the support!”

“Both Baby and Mom are doing great. Thanks to all to my sponsors who appreciate what’s important in life and all my fans for being Awesome!”


‘Leading the tournament’

What makes this story even more unbelievable is the fact that the 31-year-old was leading the tournament by two strokes through two rounds of play, having shot 13-under through the first 36 holes.

There’s no doubt Mahan made the right decision to ditch his golf clubs for a set of scrubs. After all, there will be plenty of tournaments for him to contend for in the future. Unlike competing at the RBC Canadian Open or even a major, the birth of a child is a one-time deal.

Do you think Hunter Mahan did the right thing when he left in the middle of the RBC Canadian Open to attend to his family? Would you have done the same if you were in his shoes?

Source: Patrick Clarke | Bleacher Report

Image: Golf Week

The Effect Of Gender-Stereotyping Our Kids

The Effect Of Gender-Stereotyping Our KidsA few years ago at my son’s preschool camp award ceremony, I sat silently as well-meaning counselors called each child forward. Girls: best hair, best clothes, best friend, best helper and best artist. Boys: best runner, best climber, best builder and best thrower. My son won best soccer player. In general, girls received awards for their personalities and appearance and boys for their actions and physical attributes.

‘Shape their interactions’

The gender disparity was subtle but present. And then my daughter got her certificate, showing her in a funky orange sweater, tight pants, and holding a bowling ball. Her award — best dressed.

Sometimes, I find the prospect of raising a girl to be terrifying. The forces of patriarchy conspire to render girls weak, subordinate and sexually objectified. When we respond to infants by gendering our speech, strong for boys and lilting for girls, we immediately start to shape their interactions with the world.


‘Closeted and coddled’

The teenage years with the new dangers of sex, alcohol, eating disorders and more will arrive before we know it. I can’t save her from all of this, and anyway we buy into purity culture (the notion that only a father’s constant surveillance can save our daughters) at our peril and the peril of our daughters. Our daughters need to be strong, not closeted and coddled. We have to arm them with the tools to question, resist and change our patriarchal culture.

Our culture constantly projects the message that only appearances matter, and this message is aimed squarely at our children. We can fight this only by working against the grain, resisting gendered language and emphasizing the internal over the external.

Are you also guilty of gender-stereotyping your kids? Do you agree or disagree with this write-up?

Source: David M. Perry, CNN

Image: NY Metro Parents