U.K. Parliament Rejects Military Strike On Syria

U.K. Parliament Rejects Military Strike On SyriaMPs have rejected possible UK military action against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s government to deter the use of chemical weapons.

‘Disappointed’

David Cameron said he would respect the defeat of a government motion by 285-272, ruling out joining US-led strikes. Speaking in Parliament immediately after the vote, the prime minister said:

“It is clear to me that the British Parliament, reflecting the views of the British people, does not want to see British military action. I get that and the government will act accordingly.”

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond later told BBC’s News night programme he and the prime minister were “disappointed” with the result of the Commons vote which he said would harm Britain’s “special relationship” with Washington. But he said he did not expect Britain’s decision to “stop any action” by other countries.


‘British national interest’

Labour leader Ed Miliband said the result meant military action was “off the agenda”, and added that MPs had reacted against the prime minister’s “cavalier and reckless” leadership. Mr Miliband said Britain’s relationship with the US “cannot simply be about doing what the American president says he wants you to do”.

“Sometimes, under my leadership, we’ll have disagreements with the United States, we’ll take a different view to them, but we’ve got to operate on the basis of the British national interest,” he added.

The defeat comes as a potential blow to the authority of Mr Cameron, who had already watered down a government motion proposing military action, in response to Labour’s demands for more evidence of President Assad’s guilt.

Should other countries go ahead with the military strike against Syria? What is your stance regarding this controversial issue?

Source: BBC News

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David Cameron Apologizes For ‘Double Injustice’ In Hillsborough Tragedy

David Cameron has said he is profoundly sorry for the “double injustice” of the Hillsborough football disaster. Speaking after an independent report into previously unseen documents about the tragedy, the prime minister said police had failed to do enough and had also tried to blame Liverpool fans. Ninety-six fans died after a crush at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground in 1989.

Campaigner Trevor Hicks said the report showed a faster response from emergency services could have saved lives. Mr Hicks, who lost two daughters in the disaster and is a member of the family support group, said it would now press for criminal action against those involved in the disaster. The report has been compiled by the Hillsborough Independent Panel, which scrutinised more than 450,000 pages of documents over the last 18 months.

By analysing post-mortem test results, the panel found 28 of the 96 victims had no “obstruction of blood circulation” and there was “separate evidence that, in 31, the heart and lungs had continued to function after the crush”. The medical advisor on the panel, Dr Bill Kirkup, said up to 41 of the 96 who died could have potentially been saved if they had received treatment earlier.


The report comes after 23 years of campaigning from Liverpool fans and relatives of the victims to find out exactly what happened on the day of the disaster, which saw the biggest loss of life at any UK sporting event.

The report showed police and emergency services had made “strenuous attempts” to deflect the blame for the disaster on to fans.  The report also found South Yorkshire Police had changed some of the 164 statements made in the wake of the tragedy. It found 116 of the police statements identified for “substantive amendment” had been “amended to remove or alter comments unfavourable to South Yorkshire Police”.

What punishment should be given to those at fault for the cover-up in the Hillsborough football tragedy? Share your opinions with us via the comment box below!

Source: BBC News

Image: Coming Home Newcastle