Andrew Keen: Facebook Is ‘Zucking Up’ Human Society

Something even dodgier than a potential stock market fraud is going on. By sabotaging what it really means to be human, Facebook is stealing the innocence of our inner lives. It may even be “Zucking” us up as a species.

We are creating a world in which our sense of identity, of who we actually are, is defined by what others think of us. Social media’s ubiquity means that we are losing that most precious of human things — our sense of self . Our devices are always on; our “Timeline” is there for everyone to see; we are living in public on a radically transparent global network that, by 2020, will be fed by 50 billion intelligent devices carried by the majority of people on the planet. Yes, digital narcissism is a narcotic.


It’s time to wake up to the truth about social media. Networks like Facebook have turned us into products in which their only economic value is our personal data. Like any other addiction, we need recognize its destructive reality. Facebook is free because it sells our most intimate data to advertisers. Forget about last week’s dodgy IPO. The fraud is on anyone who has ever used Facebook.

At the dawn of our brave new networked 21st century world, we are faced with two options. Either, we succumb to the narcotic of digital narcissism, turn ourselves inside out and let our kids inherit a world in which the quiet mystery of the disciplined private self becomes a historical artifact. Or we fight our growing addiction to social media so that we are no longer enslaved to the personal update, the tweet or the check-in. Privacy or publicness? It’s not a hard choice. Zuck-up or save the species. I trust you’ll know which one to make.

Have you already been “Zucked up” by Facebook? Tell us what you think about this write-up!

Source: CNN

Image: Scoop

Smart Ways to Pet Proof Your Home

Baby animals are cute — but often destructive. Here’s how to protect them and your house.

See the world at pet eye-level. Pets definitely explore their environments by tasting, and they put everything in their mouths. We think children are bad — but that’s nothing compared to what a pet will do. Get down on the floor and check every room for hazards, she says. Look for exposed electrical cords, poisonous house-plants, and small objects, such as earrings, hair scrunchies, and toys.

Train your pet to chew on acceptable objects. If you catch your puppy or kitten chewing on your leather boot, clap your hands to interrupt the act, Miller says. “No punishment, no anger,” she says. Just make it a teachable moment. “Direct that behavior onto an appropriate object: a chew toy, a rawhide — something that’s safe and rewarding.”


Give your kitten a scratching post. It’s useless to punish a kitten that claws the sofa, because scratching is a natural behavior, Miller says. Instead, provide a scratching post or pad. Exercise your dog: Just 30 minutes of vigorous exercise a day can tire her enough to slow down the destructive behavior.

Here are more pet-proofing pointers from Cruz and Miller:

Screen all windows tightly. So many cats and small dogs are hurt or killed falling out of unscreened windows that veterinarians have a term for it: “high-rise syndrome.” Close up trash cans, which can be full of toxic items, sharp objects, and human foods harmful to pets. Avoid draperies with long cords and tassels that can strangle a pet. Trim your pet’s nails regularly to prevent damage to leather and vinyl furniture.

Source: Web MD

Image: Pet Side