Marijuana For Diabetes?

Marijuana For DiabetesToking up may help marijuana users to slim and lower their risk of developing diabetes, according to the latest study, which suggests that cannabis compounds may help in controlling blood sugar.

‘Two-faced relationship’

Although marijuana has a well-deserved reputation for increasing appetite via what stoners call “the munchies,” the new research, which was published in the American Journal of Medicine, is not the first to find that the drug has a two-faced relationship to weight. Three prior studies have shown that marijuana users are less likely to be obese, have a lower risk for diabetes and have lower body-mass-index measurements. And these trends occurred despite the fact that they seemed to take in more calories.

Why? “The most important finding is that current users of marijuana appeared to have better carbohydrate metabolism than nonusers,” says Murray Mittleman, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and the lead author of the study. “Their fasting insulin levels were lower, and they appeared to be less resistant to the insulin produced by their body to maintain a normal blood-sugar level.”


‘Beneficial effects’

Marijuana users also had higher levels of high-density lipoprotein, the so-called good cholesterol, which can protect against heart disease. And the regular smokers also boasted smaller waistlines: on average, they were 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) slimmer than the former users and those who had never smoked cannabis.

Researchers don’t yet know how to explain these correlations — and since the study was not a controlled trial, it’s not clear whether marijuana or some other factor in marijuana users’ lifestyles actually accounted for the beneficial effects. Studies showed, however, that the cannabinoid brain receptors affected by marijuana are deeply involved in appetite and metabolism. But the exact details of how the compound alters the relationship between appetite, caloric intake and insulin response isn’t obvious yet.

Do you think marijuana could be used later on as a legitimate treatment for diabetes? Share your thoughts on this health issue!

Source: Maia Szalavitz, TIME.com, CNN

Image: Fox News

Daily Soft Drink Increases Diabetes Risk

Daily Soft Drink Increases Diabetes RiskDrinking one or more cans of sugary soft drinks a day is linked to an increased risk of diabetes in later life, a study suggests. A can a day raises the relative risk of Type-2 diabetes by about a fifth, compared with one can a month or under, say European scientists. The in the journal Diabetologia mirrors previous US findings.

‘Calorific’

A diabetes charity recommends limiting sugary foods and drinks as they are calorific and can cause weight gain. The latest research was carried out in the UK, Germany, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Sweden, France and the Netherlands. Some 350,000 individuals were questioned about their diet, as part of a large European study looking at links between diet and cancer.

“The consumption of sugar sweetened soft drinks increases your risk of diabetes – so for every can of soft drinks that you drink per day, the risk is higher,” lead researcher Dora Romaguera from Imperial College London told BBC News.


‘Deleterious effect on health’

She called for clearer public health information on the effects of sugary soft drinks: ”Given the increase in sweet beverage consumption in Europe, clear messages on its deleterious effect on health should be given to the population,” Dr Romaguera and colleagues conclude in their research paper.

Gavin Partington, director general of the drinks industry body the British Soft Drinks Association said: “Soft drinks are safe to consume but, like all other food and drink, should be consumed in moderation as part of a balanced diet.”

How many glasses or cans of soft drinks do you consume in a day? Do you think you are in danger of having diabetes later on in life?

Source: BBC News

Image: The West Australian