Six Abandoned Bulldog Puppies Rescued From Locked Suitcase

An Ohio man has been charged with animal abandonment after Humane Society authorities matched his name with a suitcase in which the six puppies had been trapped. The suitcase, allegedly belonging to Howard Davis, 53, had been left next to a garbage can in a Toledo alleyway.

The puppies were discovered after someone noticed their mother pacing around the closed suitcase. Toledo Area Humane Society spokeswoman Cyndi Condit told Reuters that Davis lives only two blocks from where the puppies were found.

“Howard’s name was on the tag of the suitcase and the mother was licensed to him,” Condit said.


If convicted, Davis faces a maximum sentence of 90 days in jail and a $750 fine. Davis claims the suitcase was stolen from him and that he had given the dogs to a friend in Michigan. Over the next four weeks, the three male and three female puppies will remain with their mother before they are eligible for adoption. But they also have a job to do in the meantime: literally serving as evidence against Davis.

“It’s unfortunate he chose to abandon the dogs,” said Humane Society’s executive director John Dinon. “If he had just called us and said he couldn’t care for them, we would have taken them and he wouldn’t have been charged with a crime.”

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Paw Nation

Previously Unknown ‘Lost World’ Discovered in Antarctica

Communities of species previously unknown to science have been discovered on the seafloor near Antarctica, clustered in the hot, dark environment surrounding hydrothermal vents.

“Hydrothermal vents are home to animals found nowhere else on the planet that get their energy not from the Sun but from breaking down chemicals, such as hydrogen sulphide,” said Professor Alex Rogers of Oxford University’s Department of Zoology, who led the research. “The first survey of these particular vents, in the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, has revealed a hot, dark, ‘lost world’ in which whole communities of previously unknown marine organisms thrive.”

 In the “hadal” zone, which at 11,000 meters is deeper than Mount Everest is high – the pressure rises to 1,000 bar, or a ton per square centimeter. And as there is practically no light, and plants cannot grow, there is little food. It offers a glimpse of what life on Jupiter’s moon, Europa, might look like.For the first time, researchers led by the University of Oxford, University of Southampton and British Antarctic Survey, used a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) to explore the East Scotia Ridge deep beneath the Southern Ocean, where hydrothermal vents, including ‘black smokers’ reaching temperatures of up to 382 degrees Celsius, create a unique environment that lacks sunlight, but is rich in certain chemicals.

“What we didn’t find is almost as surprising as what we did,” said Professor Rogers. “Many animals such as tubeworms, vent mussels, vent crabs, and vent shrimps, found in hydrothermal vents in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans, simply weren’t there.”

The team reports its findings in this week’s issue of the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology.

 

Source and Image: The Daily Galaxy