Organize Your Closet With the Help of a Phone App

You can use your iPhone to “favorite” looks from a fashion show, so why not be able to do the same thing with your own closet?  Our online retailer of the week, TouchCloset, makes it happen.

Launched late last year, the mobile style app focuses on helping users organize what they already own, rather than search for and acquire new stuff.  Just snap a photo with your iPhone camera, or upload an image from an album.  Next, tag it with various information — category, color, name, and brand. Once you have all that information in, just start creating and naming outfits.

You can also use the app to, say, pick out clothes to pack for a trip — which means, theoretically, you can start getting organized for a vacation from your office desk. Meanwhile, a “shop” feature allows users to browse retailers and add items to a wish list, though the e-commerce side certainly takes a back seat to the app’s management tools.


The program also lets you easily flip through all your saved items, the way an iPod scrolls through album covers.  When out shopping, that particular aspect could come in handy — you’ll never accidentally buy a repeat item again.  The only downside to the app, we think, is that it’s a hefty $9.99.  However, that only emphasizes TouchCloset’s role as a unique personal organizer and not a vehicle for e-commerce.

While Cher’s 90s-era closet might still be a pipe dream, ten bucks seems like a small price to pay to have a pictorial catalog of all your clothes at your fingertips.

Source: The High Low

Image: Touch Closet

What Italians Think of British Winter Clothes

Being Italian may be bad for your health. Being British could be fatal.

My four and six-year old Anglo-Italian children want to play outside in our garden in London early morning at the end of November. The kids are dressed in flimsy cotton pyjamas. But my British partner doesn’t hesitate to open the back door and let them out.

I yank them both back in and bundle them in padded jackets, thick socks, boots, hats, and scarves. Oh, and gloves. Just to be sure. Then again, as anglicised as I am after decades of living here in London, I clearly haven’t turned completely British yet either.

Growing up in Italy, I was told repeatedly by Italian family and friends that the cold can kill you. In any case, it is not just an Italian ailment. I spent time in Indonesia too when I was younger. There they call it “masuk angin”, or “the entry of air”, an affliction which shares many similarities with Italy’s “colpo d’aria”.

As a child, there was a definite downside to this Italian obsession with health. Summers on the beach for instance. Swimming after food was a complete no-no. We were fed horror stories about children who had disobeyed the no-swimming rule, only to be hit by intestinal cramps in the water. This meant the hottest part of the day – the hours after lunch – were spent sitting on the beach watching the foreign kids frolic in the surf. A full meal required a three hour no-swimming rule. A couple of biscuits might set you back half an hour. Every minute counted.

 

Source: BBC News

Image: Italylogue.com