Guerilla Sticker Craze Sweeps London Underground

If you are one of millions of Londoners who stoically battles through the Tube’s rush hour commute, you will no doubt pass dozens of Transport for London signs and notices on your journey. But how much attention do you actually pay to them?

Take the following examples:

“No eye contact. Penalty £200.”

“We apologise for any incontinence caused during these engineering works.”

“Peak hours may necessitate you let other people sit on your lap.”

These are a few of a growing number of guerrilla stickers that have recently appeared on the network. They use the same fonts and designs as London Underground’s famous branding. But they subvert the intended message making often amusing but sometimes serious points about anything from overcrowding to Tube etiquette. But British Transport Police (BTP) warned: “The costs of graffiti are substantial for the railway industry in terms of repairs and clean-up, and can leave permanent scars on the infrastructure.”


The BBC spoke to a spokesman for the website which sells stickers similar to some of those which have appeared on the Tube. He referred to himself as James, from east London, and said his site had sold about 200 stickers “for the Underground” so far this year, at an average cost of £2 per sticker. He believes the stickers are about “taking back power”.

He said he has seen the stickers growing in popularity. But he defends his website for selling the stickers: ”I’m not putting them up and the website cannot endorse them being stuck on the Tube,” he said. ”It’s not graffiti. Stickers can be removed,” he added. “It’s up to people where they stick the stickers. I don’t think it’s been doing any particular harm.”

Do you find these “Guerilla stickers” amusing or just another eyesore? Feel free to share your thoughts with us!

Source: BBC News

Image: The Poke

‘Climate Change’ Sends Eskimos Packing

The indigenous people of Alaska have stood firm against some of the most extreme weather conditions on Earth for thousands of years. But now, flooding blamed on climate change is forcing at least one Eskimo village to move to safer ground.

The community of the tiny coastal village of Newtok voted to relocate its 340 residents to new homes 9 miles away, up the Ninglick River. The village, home to indigenous Yup’ik Eskimos, is the first of possibly scores of threatened Alaskan communities that could be abandoned.

Warming temperatures are melting coastal ice shelves and frozen sub-soils, which act as natural barriers to protect the village against summer deluges from ocean storm surges. The crisis is unique because its devastating effects creep up on communities, eating away at their infrastructure, unlike with sudden natural disasters such as wildfires, earthquakes or hurricanes.

The village crisis is taking place as more than 400 indigenous people from 80 nations gather 500 miles (800 kilometers) away in Anchorage, Alaska, at the first Indigenous Peoples’ Global Summit on Climate Change. Summit delegates will work on a declaration outlining the climate change-related issues facing indigenous people. The declaration will be agreed upon Friday and presented at the Conference of Parties United Framework Convention on Climate Change in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December.

“Climigration” refers to the forced and permanent migration of communities because of severe climate change effects on essential infrastructure. This differs from migration caused by catastrophic environmental events such as hurricanes and earthquakes. The concept of “climigration” implies that there is no possibility of these communities returning home, said Alaskan human rights lawyer Robin Bronen, who coined the term.

 

Source: CNN.com

Image: Digitaljournal.com