The Truth About Cleaning Your Sheets

No matter your relationship status, you never go to bed alone. Nestled within your sheets are countless intruders. For an explanation, we turned to Philip M. Tierno Jr., director of clinical microbiology and immunology at New York University’s Langone Medical Center.

How often should they change their sheets?

Wash sheets and pillowcases once a week, and you’ll eliminate that debris that has accumulated in the bed for that week. You’ll be safer from breathing in that material.

Debris? How can sheets possibly get that dirty?

Human skin cells become food for dust mites. That is one of the biggest problems associated with bedding. Mites accumulate, along with their feces. But there is also animal hair, dander, fungal mold, fungal spores, bodily secretions and bacteria. Also: dust, lint, fibers, particulates, insect parts, pollen, soil, sand and cosmetics.


All this stuff is yucky, but is it a health risk?

It is mainly a threat to respiratory tracts and not an infectious source. If you have allergies or asthma, this matter can exacerbate it. If you don’t have an allergy, you could develop one because you’re constantly challenged.

Is there an ideal way to wash bedding?

The water should be 130 to 150 degrees Fahrenheit, typically the washing machine’s hot-water cycle. Then dry using a hot drying cycle. That is germicidal; it actually kills and destroys a lot of vegetative material. It also kills the dust mites. For extra protection, “bleach is excellent.”

Once a week, hot water. Then I’m safe?

No. To protect the mattress, I use an impervious outer cover. If you look at a mattress, it collects debris by gravity. All kinds of things collect on it that are absorbed into its core. Without the impervious cover, your mattress is a “zoological and botanical garden,” he says.

Can you share other tips for handling and cleaning bed sheets? Feel free to type in your suggestions below!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Shelter Pop

How Often Should I Wash My Hair?

A clean head of hair feels fresh and smells great but over-washing can turn one’s healthy locks into a pile of straw. How often you need to shampoo depends on how oily your scalp is and your hair’s texture.

Oil-known as sebum-travels more easily down smooth, straight hair, making it look greasier faster. Sounds a little gross, but sebum helps moisturize and waterproof the hair shaft. This is one reason why curly or coarse hair is drier. When you wash every day, you typically strip off this natural moisturizer and then have to slather it back on in the form of commercial conditioner.

Joe Murray, owner of Hale Organic Salon in New York City, tells Yahoo! Shine that shampooing a couple of times a week is plenty. On gym days, try simply rinsing with water instead of shampooing and finish with a light conditioner to detangle.


People with flaky scalps may be inclined to shampoo frequently, but dermatologist and spokesperson for the American Academy of Dermatology, Nia Terezakis, MD says this can actually exacerbate the problem. When you choose a shampoo, Terezakis says to pick a product that is made for your specific hair type whether it be oily, dry, limp, curly, etc. One exception: “Baby shampoos aren’t necessarily gentle on adult hair,” she warns. “They don’t sting the eyes but they can be drying.”

If you are used to washing your hair daily, it can take a few weeks to get used to a new routine. You may be over producing sebum to compensate for stripping the scalp. Gradually increase the days between shampooing and see if your hair becomes healthier and takes more time to appear dirty as a result.

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Greasy Hair