Hollywood Mall Bans Manny Pacquiao After ‘Anti-Gay’ Rant

Manny Pacquiao won’t be shopping with the stars ever again, as the homophobic boxing superstar has been banned from Hollywood’s ultimate entertainment destination.

LA Weekly’s Simone Wilson reports Pacquiao has been outlawed by the commercial center for his over-the-top anti-gay statements this week. While quoting Bible verses, the boxing star didn’t just say he was against the homosexual lifestyle, Pacquiao stunningly divulged gay men should be “put to death” for their sexual crimes.

Management at the Grove quickly issued a statement explaining why the boxer has been officially forbidden from entering the star-studded shopping mecca: “Based on news reports of statements made by Mr. Pacquiao we have made it be known that he is not welcome at The Grove and will not be interviewed here now or in the future. The Grove is a gathering place for all Angelenos and not a place for intolerance.”


Since then, it has come out that the original article attributed a quote to Pacquiao that he never said: Granville Ampong, the “conservative examiner” over at Examiner.com (a news website that lets just about anyone submit articles) now says Pacquiao never referenced the offensive passage taken from Leviticus 20:13, which states that “if a man lies with a man as one lies with a woman, both of them have done what is detestable. They must be put to death; their blood will be on their own heads.”

Still, the prejudiced pugilist attempted to defend his position with media in the Philippines: “I only gave out my opinion that same sex marriage is against the law of God,” he told ABS-CBN’s Dyan Castillejo. ”I’m not against gay people … I have a relative who is also gay. We can’t help it if they were born that way. What I’m critical of are actions that violate the word of God.”

Did Manny Pacquiao deserve to be banned from the Hollywood Mall? Tell us what you think!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Global Grind

Controversial Claim About Mayan Ruins in Georgia

The textbooks will tell you that the Mayan people thrived in Central America from about 250 to 900 A.D., building magnificent temples in Guatemala, Honduras, Belize and southern Mexico. But could they possibly have left stone ruins in the mountains of North Georgia?

Richard Thornton thinks so. He says he’s an architect by training, but has been researching the history of native people in and around Georgia for years. On Examiner.com, he wrote about an 1,100-year-old archeological site near Georgia’s highest mountain, Brasstown Bald, that he said “is possibly the site of the fabled city of Yupaha, which Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto failed to find in 1540.”

This might all be fairly arcane stuff, except that an archeologist he cited, Mark Williams of the University of Georgia, took exception. In the comments section after Thornton’s piece, he wrote, “I am the archaeologist Mark Williams mentioned in this article. This is total and complete bunk. There is no evidence of Maya in Georgia. Move along now.”

Immediately the story exploded. In comments on Examiner, as well as on Facebook and in emails, users piled on. One woman called Williams “completely pompous and arrogant.” A man wrote he was “completely disrespectful to the Public at large.” Another said he would urge the state of Georgia to cut off funding for Williams’ academic department at the university. All of this left Thornton, who writes often about the Maya for Examiner.com, “dumfounded.”

 

Source: Yahoo! News

Image: Digital Journalism