Viral Photo Helps Extend Arthritic Dog’s Life

A photograph of a man wading in Lake Superior with his 19-year-old arthritic dog captured the hearts of millions when it was posted online last month–an outpouring that inspired the dog’s owner to launch a foundation to help low-income families care for their aging canines.

John Unger says Schoep’s Legacy Foundation has raised more than $25,000 since Unger and his dog, Schoep, were photographed by a friend, who posted the image to Facebook. Before the photo was taken, Unger and his veterinarian had been considering putting Schoep down.

“Without treatment, John and I were talking about euthanasia at the end of July,” Erik Haukass, the vet, told the Daily Mail. But through the unsolicited donations from people who saw the photo, Unger was able to treat Schoep and extend his life: “Schoep is doing incredible right now,” Unger said. ‘The therapies that the people have donated–it’s like turning back the clock a year and a half.”


The “Official Fan Page of Schoep and John” has more than 20,000 “likes,” and Hudson has been selling prints of the photo to benefit the cause.

“This 19-year-old [Schoep is] being cradled in his father’s arms last night in Lake Superior,” Hannah Stonehouse Hudson, the photographer, wrote in the Facebook post that sparked the outpouring. “Schoep falls asleep every night when he is carried into the lake. The buoyancy of the water soothes his arthritic bones. Lake Superior is very warm right now, so the temperature of the water is perfect. I was so happy I got to capture this moment for John. By the way, John rescued Schoep as an 8-month-old puppy, and he’s been by his side through many adventures.”

Because of the public’s generosity, Schoep has been getting expensive joint laser treatments to reduce pain and swelling related to arthritis. “He’s walking so much faster,” the 49-year-old Unger said. “It’s unbelievable.”

Were you moved by the story of Schoep and his loving owner? Feel free to share your own pet stories with us!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Animal Tracks

America’s First Female Astronaut Dies At 61

Sally Ride, the first American woman to journey into space, died on Monday after a 17-month battle with pancreatic cancer, her foundation announced. She was 61.

Ride first launched into space in 1983 aboard the Challenger shuttle, taking part in the seventh mission of US space shuttle program. US President Barack Obama called her a “national hero and a powerful role model” who “inspired generations of young girls to reach for the stars.”

NASA administrator Charles Bolden said in a statement Ride “literally changed the face of America’s space program” and that “the nation has lost one of its finest leaders, teachers, and explorers.” The agency’s deputy administrator Lori Garver added that the trailblazing astronaut was a “personal and professional role model to me and thousands of women around the world.”

Ride, born May 26, 1951, in southern California, earned degrees in physics and English from Stanford University. She applied to be an astronaut at US space agency NASA in 1977, after seeing an ad in her university’s student newspaper. It was the first time the space agency had allowed applications from civilians — or from women. Ride was one of 35 people, including just six women, chosen from a pool of 8,000 applicants.


She flew in two space missions, logging nearly 350 hours in space. However, after the Challenger explosion that killed all seven crew members, her third planned mission was grounded in 1986. Ride served on the commission to investigate the accident, and was then assigned to NASA headquarters. She retired from the agency in 1987.

She founded Sally Ride Science in 2001, directed NASA-funded education projects, and also co-authored seven science books for children. Ride is survived by Tam O’Shaughnessy, her partner of 27 years, as well as by her mother, sister, niece and nephew.

How did Sally Ride’s legacy inspire you in achieving your dreams? Share your thoughts and opinions about women flying into space.

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Global Grind