How To Chill A Drink Fast

The heat of the summer is upon us. And I’m sure I’m not the only one asking: What’s the fastest way to chill a drink?

Fridge

Depending on the starting temperature, cooling drinks in the fridge takes anywhere from 45 minutes to 2 hours. Not nearly fast enough when you’re parched.

Freezer

To speed the process, you can wrap a wet paper towel around them and stick them in the freezer. That’s faster — like 20 minutes. And the physics of the wet paper towel is pretty interesting. It works the same way that perspiration cools you down: evaporation draws the heat away from your skin — or away from your drinks. Just don’t let your drinks freeze all the way. But 20 minutes is still too long.


Ice water

Putting your drinks in a bath of ice water chills them even faster than a freezer. Why? Because water conducts heat more easily than air. Compare sitting around in a 68-degree room to sitting around in a 68-degree tub and you’ll quickly see what I mean.

The Solution

I had read that putting salt in the ice water can chill your drinks even faster. Why would this work? Salt water has a lower freezing point than fresh water (which is why salt is often put on roads to prevent icy conditions), and adding salt to a bowl of ice water actually decreases the temperature of the water.

What is your preferred way of chilling your drinks? What is your favorite summer drink? Share your refreshing ideas with us in the comment box below!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Life of a Lil Notty Monkey

Foods That Should Be Kept Out of the Fridge

And as it turns out, the refrigerator is not the go-to storage unit for all your produce. Below are 5 types of produce you shouldn’t keep in your fridge.

Tomatoes: The fridge is not the ideal place to store tomatoes. Store them there and your perfect tomatoes turn into a mealy disappointment. They’ll still be good for cooking, but not the best for eating fresh. Instead store them on your counter (not in direct sunlight) and enjoy them when they’re ripe.

Basil: Extended periods of time in a cold environment like a refrigerator causes it to wilt prematurely. Basil will do best if it’s stored on your counter and treated as you would fresh cut-flowers.

Potatoes: They do best at around 45 degrees F, which is about 10 degrees warmer than the average refrigerator. Most of us don’t have a root cellar, so keeping them in a paper bag in a coolish spot (like a pantry) is best. Storing potatoes at cold temperatures converts their starch to sugar more quickly, which can affect the flavor, texture and the way they cook.


Onions: Onions don’t come out of the ground with that protective papery skin. To develop and keep that dry outer layer, they need to be “cured” and kept in a dry environment like a pantry, which is not as damp as the refrigerator. Store onions in a cool, dry, dark, well-ventilated place. (Light can cause the onions to become bitter.)

Avocados: Avocados don’t start to ripen until after they’re picked from the tree. The bottom line on storing avocados is store hard, unripe avocados on your counter and store ripe avocados in your refrigerator if you’re not going to eat them right away.

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Summer Tomato