Texas Prom Queen Arrested For ‘Fake Cancer Scam’

A Texas prom queen whose fellow students donated more than $17,000 to her charity has been arrested and accused of faking cancer.

ABC affiliate KVIA reports that 19-year-old Angie Gomez faces a felony charge and is being held on a $50,000 bond after being arrested on Friday. She is charged with starting a fake charity after falsely claiming to be suffering from leukemia.

Her fellow students donated to the “Achieve the Dream Foundation,” which Gomez set up. She was also treated to her own prom by Da Vinci High School after missing the school’s prom due to her alleged illness. That same month, police received an allegation that Gomez did not actually appear to be ill.


A subsequent investigation found that Gomez had never been a patient at the hospitals where she claimed to have been receiving treatment. Her attorney Sheldon Myers says Gomez had “good intentions” for the money and did, in fact, suffer from health problems as a child..

“She has a real soft spot for people that suffer from those types of diseases, and that’s why she was trying to get money for them,” Myers said. He added that the $50,000 bond means that Gomez isn’t likely to be released from jail.”

Is lying about your health condition justifiable if you have good intentions? Tell us what you think!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: KSEE 24 News

Arizona Bill Could Outlaw Internet Trolling

After spending years targeting illegal aliens, the Grand Canyon State is turning its sights on obnoxious Internet users (commonly called ‘trolls’). A new update to the state’s telecommunications harassment bill could make the practice of harassing people online illegal.

Arizona House Bill 2549 has already passed both of the state’s legislative bodies and is currently sitting on the desk of Governor Jan Brewer. While there’s a lot in there that doesn’t concern trolling, here’s the line that has people worried:

It is unlawful for any person, with intent to terrify, intimidate, threaten, harass, annoy or offend, to use ANY ELECTRONIC OR DIGITAL DEVICE and use any obscene, lewd or profane language or suggest any lewd or lascivious act, or threaten to inflict physical harm to the person or property of any person.


Violators could be charged with a Class 1 misdemeanor and face up to 6 months in jail. If electronic devices are used to stalk someone, the charges then become a Class 3 felony, with penalties ranging from a minimum sentence of two and a half years in jail for non-dangerous offenders with no prior record to 25 years.

Despite its good intentions, the Arizona law is already being called “overly broad” by critics. By using vague terms like “annoy” and “offend,” it could easily encompass Internet forums or even comments like the ones found at the end of this story. Free speech groups say they don’t believe the law would ever stand up to court scrutiny if Gov. Brewer does, in fact, sign it. And many have pointed out the flaws in the bill to the governor herself.

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Tick Content