Will Science Someday Rule Out God’s Existence?

Although cosmic mysteries remain, Sean Carroll, a theoretical cosmologist at the California Institute of Technology, says there’s good reason to think science will ultimately arrive at a complete understanding of the universe that leaves no grounds for God whatsoever.

Some theologians have tried to equate the moment of the Big Bang with the description of the creation of the world found in the Bible and other religious texts; they argue that something — i.e., God — must have initiated the explosive event.  However, in Carroll’s opinion, progress in cosmology will eventually eliminate any perceived need for a Big Bang trigger-puller.

As he explained in a recent article in the “Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity” (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), such a theory, called “quantum gravity,” will necessarily account for what happened at the moment of the Big Bang. Some versions of quantum gravity theory that have been proposed by cosmologists predict that the Big Bang, rather than being the starting point of time, was just “a transitional stage in an eternal universe,” in Carroll’s words.


But there are other potential grounds for God. Physicists have observed that many of the physical constants that define our universe, from the mass of the electron to the density of dark energy, are eerily perfect for supporting life. Alter one of these constants by a hair, and the universe becomes  unrecognizable.

According to Carroll, this answer pales under scrutiny. There can be no answer to such a question, he says. A complete scientific theory that accounts for everything in the universe doesn’t need an external explanation in the same way that specific things within the universe need external explanations. Psychology research suggests that belief in the supernatural acts as societal glue and motivates people to follow the rules; further, belief in the afterlife helps people grieve and staves off fears of death.

Do you believe in God, or in a supernatural being that designed the universe? OR, do you agree with Sean Carroll that there are no grounds for God in science?

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Proggin

How the Duggars are Coping With Jubilee’s Death

Even grief is exceptional in the Duggar family, as there are so many children to console. Michelle Duggar, who miscarried her 20th child this week, says she is comforting the little ones – and being comforted herself by her older kids and her husband.

It’s not just the younger kids who need solace. Jill, 20, who is studying to be a midwife and had been charting the baby’s growth and heartbeat, has had a particularly hard time.

“She was crying and weeping last night,” Michelle said Wednesday at a service for Jubilee. “I hugged her and said, ‘I am holding on, and I am going to let the tears go. We can pray, cry and grieve together in the weeks and days we walk through this.’ ”

But Michelle has been able to lean on her children, too. “My older girls have been precious to make Momma take care of Momma right now, and Jim Bob has been busy taking care of everything,” she says.

Michelle adds that despite their loss, the family plans to celebrate all their December birthdays – Josie turned 2 on Dec. 10, Jordyn turns 3 on Dec. 18, Jinger turns 18 on Dec. 21, and the twins Jedidiah and Jeremiah turn 13 on Dec. 30.

 

Source: People.com

Image: Babble.com