New Study Links Processed Meat To Early Death

New Study Links Processed Meat To Early DeathSausages, ham, bacon and other processed meats appear to increase the risk of dying young, a study of half a million people across Europe suggests. It concluded diets high in processed meats were linked to cardiovascular disease, cancer and early deaths.

‘Opting for leaner cuts’

The researchers, writing in the journal BMC Medicine, said salt and chemicals used to preserve the meat may damage health. The British Heart Foundation suggested opting for leaner cuts of meat.

The study followed people from 10 European countries for nearly 13 years on average. It showed people who ate a lot of processed meat were also more likely to smoke, be obese and have other behaviours known to damage health. However, the researchers said even after those risk factors were accounted for, processed meat still damaged health.


‘Less healthy lifestyle’

One in every 17 people followed in the study died. However, those eating more than 160g of processed meat a day – roughly two sausages and a slice of bacon – were 44% more likely to die over a typical follow-up time of 12.7 years than those eating about 20g. In total, nearly 10,000 people died from cancer and 5,500 from heart problems.

Prof Sabine Rohrmann, from the University of Zurich, told the BBC: “High meat consumption, especially processed meat, is associated with a less healthy lifestyle. But after adjusting for smoking, obesity and other confounders we think there is a risk of eating processed meat. Stopping smoking is more important than cutting meat, but I would recommend people reduce their meat intake.”

She said if everyone in the study consumed no more than 20g of processed meat a day then 3% of the premature deaths could have been prevented. The UK government recommends eating no more than 70g of red or processed meat – two slices of bacon – a day.

Do you eat a lot of processed meat everyday? Are you planning on cutting back?

Source: BBC News

Image: Science Daily

British Astronomer Sir Patrick Moore Dies At 89

British Astronomer Sir Patrick Moore Dies At 89British astronomer and broadcaster Sir Patrick Moore has died, aged 89. He “passed away peacefully at 12:25 this afternoon” at his home in Selsey, West Sussex, friends and colleagues said in a statement.

‘Fearlessly eccentric’

Sir Patrick presented the BBC programme The Sky At Night for over 50 years, making him the longest-running host of the same television show ever. He wrote dozens of books on astronomy and his research was used by the US and the Russians in their space programmes. Described by one of his close friends as “fearlessly eccentric”, Sir Patrick was notable for his habit of wearing a monocle on screen and his idiosyncratic style. Sir Patrick presented the first edition of The Sky at Night on 24 April 1957. He last appeared in an episode broadcast on Monday.

Patrick Alfred Caldwell-Moore was born at Pinner, Middlesex on 4 Mar 1923. Heart problems meant he spent much of his childhood being educated at home and he became an avid reader. His mother gave him a copy of GF Chambers’ book, The Story of the Solar System, and this sparked his lifelong passion for astronomy.


‘Outspoken views’

When war came he turned down a place at Cambridge and lied about his age to join the RAF, serving as a navigator with Bomber Command and rising to the rank of Flight Lieutenant. But the war brought him a personal tragedy after his fiancee, Lorna, was killed when an ambulance she was driving was hit by a bomb. He never married.

Sir Patrick, who had a pacemaker fitted in 2006 and received a knighthood in 2001, won a Bafta for services to television and was a honorary fellow of the Royal Society. He was a member of the UK Independence party and, briefly, the finance minister for the Monster Raving Loony Party, and attracted some controversy for his outspoken views on Europe and immigration.

Are you interested in astronomy? Do you look up to people like Sir Patrick Moore?

Source: BBC News

Image: Trend Render