‘Rightful Heir’ To British Throne Dies In Australia

An Australian forklift driver who some historians argued was the true heir to the British throne has died in the small New South Wales town he called home, his local newspaper reported Thursday.

Mike Hastings, 71, was a real-life aristocrat, born the 14th earl of Loudoun, who moved to Australia in 1960 in search of adventure. He made international headlines in 2004 when a documentary team from Britain’s Channel Four conducted extensive research into the monarchy and concluded his ancestors were cheated out of the crown in the 15th century.

Hastings, an avowed republican, died on June 30 and was buried Thursday in Jerilderie, about 750 kilometres (465 miles) southwest of Sydney, the local Wagga Wagga Daily Advertiser reported. Hastings was a descendant of England’s House of York, whose dynastic struggle with the House of Lancaster became known as the Wars of the Roses and was dramatised by William Shakespeare.


The British documentary’s historian Michael Jones found documents in France’s Rouen Cathedral that he believed showed King Edward IV, who ruled with a brief interruption from 1461 to 1483, was illegitimate. Jones believes that Edward’s father Richard of York was fighting the French at Pontoise when he was conceived, while his mother Cecily was 200 kilometres (125 miles) away at Rouen, allegedly in the amorous arms of an English archer. If true, the crown should have passed on to Edward’s younger brother George, the duke of Clarence, who was a direct ancestor to Hastings.

Hastings showed little interest in pursuing his claim to the monarchy when interviewed by AFP in 2005, citing the intense public scrutiny endured by the royals. However, he joked that his claim to the crown could prove lucrative if confirmed. His son Simon, who now becomes the 15th earl of Loudoun, also appears in no hurry to try to seize the throne.

Do you think Mike Hastings IS the true heir to the UK monarchy? If so, should his son make a rightful claim to it?

Source: Yahoo News

Image: The Huffington Post

‘Witch’s Cottage’ Discovered in Lancashire

Engineers have said they were “stunned” to unearth a 17th Century cottage, complete with a cat skeleton, during a construction project in Lancashire. The cottage was discovered near Lower Black Moss reservoir in the village of Barley, in the shadow of Pendle Hill.

Archaeologists brought in by United Utilities to survey the area found the building under a grass mound. Historians are now speculating that the well-preserved cottage could have belonged to one of the Pendle witches. The building contained a sealed room, with the bones of a cat bricked into the wall. It is believed the cat was buried alive to protect the cottage’s inhabitants from evil spirits.

Carl Sanders, United Utilities’ project manager, said: “It’s not often you come across a fairytale cottage complete with witch’s cat.

“Even before we discovered the building, there were lots of jokes from the lads about broomsticks and black cats. The find has really stunned us all… Cats feature prominently in folklore about witches. Whoever consigned this cat to such a horrible fate was clearly seeking protection from evil spirits.”

United Utilities routinely brings in experts before turning the topsoil in areas believed to have archaeological significance. The engineering project has been put on hold while the archaeologists complete their investigation of the site.

The building also contains a 19th Century kitchen range, still in its original position. Many artifacts from the building’s latter years, such as Victorian crockery, a tin bath and a bedstead, were discovered around the site.

 

Source: BBC News

Image: Digitalhen.co.uk