College Footballers Rewarded For Honesty Caught On Camera

College Footballers Rewarded For Honesty Caught On CameraFour football players from William Paterson University went shopping at a general store in Wayne, N.J., on Sunday afternoon. After spending several minutes trying to locate the store clerk, two of the players who needed sunglasses and batteries were captured on store security cameras leaving money at the register.

‘Who does that?’

Buddy’s Small Lots store manager, Marci Lederman, was taken by their honesty.

“They picked up a few items, and they left cash on the counter and waved to the cameras,” Lederman told Yahoo News. “Who does that?”

Thomas James, Kell’E Gallimore, Jelani Bruce and Anthony Biondi do that. As it turns out, the players had unknowingly entered a closed store. Lederman said a lock on the front door had malfunctioned and a half-lit store made it look like Buddy’s was open. Police phoned her to say an alarm had been tripped, but she found nothing amiss.


‘Good example’

Lederman was so impressed that she called a local TV station to share the surveillance video, which helped her identify the four young men. On Tuesday, she rewarded each of them with $50 shopping sprees.

“For me it’s the total product,” Coach Flora said. “I’m looking for guys that will come in, be here for four years, learn, develop, graduate, become good alums, give back to the university, give back to the program and along the way hopefully have some fun and set a good example.”

How many people you know are capable of that level of honesty? Feel free to share your thoughts regarding this rare good news from the sports world!

Source: Jason Sickles | Yahoo! News

Image: ABC News

Why Lying Less Makes You Feel Better

Can honesty lead to better health? A new research presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association in Orlando says people who consciously strive to lie less develop better relationships and experience fewer health problems.

“Our findings support the notion that lying less can cause better health through improving relationships,” says researcher Anita Kelly, PhD, a professor of psychology at the University of Notre Dame. “Improvements in the relationships accounted for a significant improvement in health.”

According surveys cited by Kelly, Americans lie 11 times weekly on the average. Some of those lies are huge, others are just white lies which are meant to protect reputation or avoid hurting others’ feelings. In the study that they conducted, they found a link between less lying and improved health.

“In a given week, if they told fewer lies, they also reported their health was better,” Kelly says. “The connection between lying less and improved health, following the people over 10 weeks, was amplified by being in the no-lie group. The connection was even stronger.”


Why is this so? Kelly’s findings are similar to the research findings by Sally Theran, PhD, assistant professor of psychology at Wellesley College in Wellesley, Mass.

“My research on girls and boys … indicates that the process of being authentic, or being honest and open in meaningful relationships, is significantly related to feeling less depressed and having higher self-esteem,” she says.

Theran found that honesty boosts intimacy in relationships. Although it can initially bring about conflict, it eventually leads to stronger friendships. Telling the truth can feel like a big risk sometimes, but when it is done regularly, a person feels less conflict deep in his soul.

“When we lie,” she says, “it adversely affects our self-esteem and increases our sense of shame. So, it’s not surprising at all that the authors found that telling the truth was related to all these positive outcomes.”

Do you agree that lying less can lead to better health and better relationships? How often do you lie?

 

Image: Business Insider