FBI Releases Photos Of Boston Marathon Bombing Suspects

FBI Releases Photos Of Boston Marathon Bombing SuspectsAfter three days of poring over photos and video, investigators appealed to the public to help them identify two men now considered suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings. The men were photographed walking down Boylston Street, one behind the other, near the finish line of Monday’s race.

‘Somebody out there knows these individuals’

Suspect 1 was seen wearing a light-colored, collarless shirt underneath a dark-colored jacket and wearing a dark baseball cap. The man identified as Suspect 2 was seen setting down a backpack at the site of the second explosion “within minutes” of the blasts that killed three people and wounded nearly 180, said Special Agent Rick DesLauriers, the head of the FBI’s Boston office. He was wearing a light-colored hooded sweatshirt, a black jacket and a white baseball cap turned backward.

In particular, DesLauriers asked for help from anyone standing in front of the Forum restaurant, where the second bombing happened.

“Somebody out there knows these individuals as friends, neighbors, co-workers or family members of the suspects,” DesLauriers said. “And though it may be difficult, the nation is counting on those with information to come forward and provide it to us.”


‘Watch the carnage unfold’

People with possible information on the two men were urged to go to the FBI’s website, https://bostonmarathontips.fbi.gov, or call 800-CALL-FBI (800-225-5324). By Thursday evening, authorities already had received a “large volume of calls … as a result of the photos,” an FBI official said. The FBI’s website, moreover, had been inundated with record traffic.

It wasn’t immediately known then whether any of the tips had led to the suspects. DesLauriers cautioned that anyone who think they know their identities should be careful, and consider them armed and “extremely dangerous.”

Other footage, still unreleased, shows that the two suspects stayed at the scene to watch the carnage unfold, a federal law enforcement official with knowledge of the investigation told CNN’s Susan Candiotti.

What do you think was the motive behind this act of terror? Do you think the authorities will be able to catch these suspects soon?

Source: Matt Smith and Thom Patterson, CNN

Image: The Guardian

U.K. Government to Start Monitoring Email and Web Usage

The government will be able to monitor the calls, emails, texts and website visits of everyone in the UK under new legislation set to be announced soon. Internet firms will be required to give intelligence agency GCHQ access to communications on demand, in real time.

The Home Office says the move is key to tackling crime and terrorism, but civil liberties groups have criticised it. Tory MP David Davis called it “an unnecessary extension of the ability of the state to snoop on ordinary people”. Attempts by the last Labour government to take similar steps failed after huge opposition, including from the Tories.

A new law – which may be announced in the forthcoming Queen’s Speech in May – would not allow GCHQ to access the content of emails, calls or messages without a warrant. But it would enable intelligence officers to identify who an individual or group is in contact with, how often and for how long. They would also be able to see which websites someone had visited. In a statement, the Home Office said action was needed to “maintain the continued availability of communications data as technology changes”.


Even if the move is announced in the Queen’s Speech, any new law would still have to make it through Parliament, potentially in the face of opposition in both the Commons and the Lords. The previous Labour government attempted to introduce a central, government-run database of everyone’s phone calls and emails, but eventually dropped the bid after widespread anger.

Chris Huhne, then the Lib Dem home affairs spokesman, said any legislation requiring communications providers to keep records of contact would need “strong safeguards on access”, and “a careful balance” would have to be struck “between investigative powers and the right to privacy”.

Source: BBC News

Image: A1 Social