Gunman And 2 Others Killed In Texas Shooting

A Texas constable and two others were shot dead Monday in about a half an hour of gunfire near Texas A&M University, police said.

Scott McCollum, assistant chief with the College Station police department, told reporters Monday afternoon that the three people killed were a Brazos County constable, the man authorities say exchanged gunfire with law enforcement officers and a male civilian. The city of College Station on Monday night identified the suspect at the center of the standoff as 35-year-old Thomas Caffall. As to the third victim, described as a “civilian bystander,” he was identified as 43-year-old Chris Northcliff of College Station.

Four others suffered injuries in the roughly 30-minute ordeal after law enforcement officers arrived at a residence a few blocks from the Texas A&M campus. They included College Station police Officer Justin Oehlke, who was shot in the calf, and two other officers — one of whom refused transport to an area hospital — who suffered “non-life-threatening injuries,” McCollum said. A 55-year-old female civilian who was shot was undergoing surgery Monday afternoon at a hospital, according to the assistant police chief.


He explained that police got a call shortly after 12:10 p.m. from a citizen indicating shots had been fired in the residential area just south of the university campus. He added that the constable had gone to the residence to deliver an eviction notice.

Caffall’s mother Linda Weaver issued a statement through family attorney W. Tyler Moore indicating her son, whom she called Tres, was “ill” and saying the family was “shocked and devastated by the tragedy.”

And now, we’re back in the gun control debate! What sort of reforms should the U.S. enforce to significantly lower gun crimes? Feel free to shout out your opinions below!

Source: CNN

Image: The Guardian

Cancer Survivor Jailed Over Medical Bill She Didn’t Owe

How did breast cancer survivor Lisa Lindsay end up behind bars? She didn’t pay a medical bill — one the Herrin, Ill., teaching assistant was told she didn’t owe.

“She got a $280 medical bill in error and was told she didn’t have to pay it,” The Associated Press reports. “But the bill was turned over to a collection agency, and eventually state troopers showed up at her home and took her to jail in handcuffs.”

Although the U.S. abolished debtors’ prisons in the 1830s, more than a third of U.S. states allow the police to haul people in who don’t pay all manner of debts, from bills for health care services to card and auto loans. Under the law, debtors aren’t arrested for nonpayment, but rather for failing to respond to court hearings, pay legal fines, or otherwise showing “contempt of court” in connection with a creditor lawsuit.


According to the ACLU: “The sad truth is that debtors’ prisons are flourishing today, more than two decades after the Supreme Court prohibited imprisoning those who are too poor to pay their legal debts. In this era of shrinking budgets, state and local governments have turned aggressively to using the threat and reality of imprisonment to squeeze revenue out of the poorest defendants who appear in their courts.”

Such practices, heightened in recent years by the effects of the recession, amount to criminalizing poverty, say critics in urging federal authorities to intervene. “More people are unemployed, more people are struggling financially, and more creditors are trying to get their debt paid,” Madigan told the AP.

Do you think debtors’ prisons should be abolished for good? Share your opinions with us!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: NY Daily News