Asiana Airlines Plane Crashes At San Francisco Airport

Asiana Airlines Plane Crashes At San Francisco AirportIt had been an uneventful 10-plus hour flight from Seoul, South Korea, approaching San Francisco’s airport on a clear summer day. Then, in a few horrifying seconds, that calm was shattered.

‘Lopped off entirely’

A fireball erupted after the Boeing 777 airliner hit the runway hard around 11:30 a.m., rocked back and forth, spun around, shearing off the plane’s tail. Scores of passengers and crew climbed out — some jumping, others sliding down evacuation chutes as flames and smoke billowed from the aircraft’s windows.

Two people were found dead outside the plane, according to San Francisco fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White. The airline identified the dead girls as students Wang Linjia and Ye Mengyuan, both 16. Somehow, 305 others survived.

Video taken soon after the crash and posted on YouTube showed dark gray smoke rising from the plane, which was upright on its belly, with no landing gear evident. Its roof was charred and, in spots, gone entirely. The back of the plane appeared to have been lopped off entirely..


‘No signs of terrorism’

Investigators from Washington and Seoul are heading to northern California trying to answer a simple question. How did this happen? While the exact cause will take months to determine, the South Korean Transport Ministry said “the tail of the Asiana flight hit the runway and the aircraft veered to the left out of the runway.”

Members of South Korea’s Aviation and Railway Accident Investigation Board will travel to San Francisco, that agency said. They’ll be joined by a “go-to” team from the United States’ National Transportation Safety Board, led by chairman Deborah Hersman. Right now, they’re not sure what they’ll find, though a U.S. national security official has said there are no signs of terrorism.

What do you think caused this deadly plane crash? Feel free to share your speculations with us via the comment box below!

Source: Greg Botelho | CNN

Image: Softpedia

Former Investigators Want Missile Theory Probe On TWA Flight 800 Crash

Former Investigators Want Missile Theory Probe On TWA Flight 800 CrashA handful of aviation experts, including a number of investigators who were part of the original probe of TWA Flight 800, have come forward in a new documentary to say evidence points to a missile as the cause of the crash off the coast of Long Island 17 years ago.

‘Multiple eyewitness accounts’

The New York-to-Paris flight crashed July 17, 1996, just minutes after takeoff from JFK Airport, killing all 230 people aboard. In the weeks that followed, the plane was reassembled in a hangar from parts retrieved from the sea. But the cause of the crash was not identified immediately, and after authorities said the crash was caused by static electricity ignited fuel fumes, many skeptics cast doubt on the theory. Adding to the controversy were multiple eyewitness accounts of a fireball going up from the ground and hitting the plane before it went down, accounts which the FBI dismissed at the time.

The half-dozen investigators whose charges will be fleshed out in a documentary set to air July 17 – the anniversary of the crash – say they were never allowed to get at the truth. But they are confident a missile brought down the plane.


‘Not allowed to seek answers’

The group is comprised of people who worked for the National Transportation Safety Board, TWA and the Airline Pilots Association, all of whom have since retired. All six say that the evidence shows the plane was brought down by a projectile traveling at a high speed.

Hank Hughes, a retired senior accident investigator for NTSB, said probers were not allowed to seek answers once the FBI took over the crime scene.

“We just want to see the truth come out,” Hughes said. “We don’t have hidden agendas. The only thing we are looking for is the truth.”

The NTSB said it will review the petition.

Do you believe a missile brought down TWA Flight 800 in 1996? Feel free to share your speculations with us!

Source: Fox News

Image: MSN News