Baby Elephant Rescue Touches Hearts Of Many

Baby Elephant Rescue Touches Hearts Of ManyA baby stuck in a well. A frantic mother crazed with worry for her offspring. Anyone could relate, but these very human emotions came from the bond of an elephant baby and her mother. And a video capturing the rescued calf has captivated the web.

‘Too deep to climb out’

Just your typical day in Amboseli National Park in Kenya, where a team of elephant conservationists from the Amboseli Trust for Elephants received a call about a baby stuck in a five-foot hole dug by Masai tribesmen. They raced to the site of the accident.

The baby was fine, but the hole was too deep for the eight-month-old calf to climb out. And the mother was unable to help. To complicate matters, the mother thought the rescuers were a threat, and almost sat on the Land Rover. The driver, Dr. Vicki Fishlock, resident scientist of the elephant trust, recognized the mother, Zombe, from a mark on her ear.


‘A happy ending’

The scientist scared her away with a high-pitched yell and maneuvered around her, as two men managed to get rope around the baby. By attaching the line to an SUV and putting the vehicle into reverse, they were able to pull the elephant calf out. A happy ending, but especially rewarding because the video captures the baby’s sprint to its mother’s side.

The rescue is a reminder of the challenges faced by humans and elephants that share the land. Without the rescue, the elephant would have died in the well, causing conflict with the Masai. Fishlock added, ” We are delighted by the web response to our video, and we hope it persuades people that elephants are special and deserve to be protected and cherished.”

Did the story and the video of this baby elephant’s rescue bring tears to your eyes? Feel free to share your thoughts with us!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: BBC News

How Do We Solve the Plastic Bag Problem?

The European Commission is to publish proposals in the spring designed to reduce the number of plastic bags used in Europe each year. Most of the 15,000 people who took part in a public consultation favoured an outright ban – but what are the options?

Last year Italy became the first country in Europe to ban non-biodegradable single-use plastic bags. A number of countries have banned very thin plastic bags, including China, South Africa, Kenya, Uganda and Bangladesh – in Bangladesh’s case, it was found that the bags had clogged up the drainage system, exacerbating deadly floods.

The Republic of Ireland introduced a charge of 15 euro cents (12p, 20 US cents) per bag in March 2002, which led to a 95% reduction in plastic bag litter. Belgium, Germany, Spain, Norway and the Netherlands are among the countries following Ireland’s lead.


If shoppers stop using plastic bags, they must start using other kinds of bags, but there is no perfect solution. Stronger, heavier bags, whether made of fabric or plastic, have a bigger environmental impact than standard supermarket shopping bags. For instance, if a plastic bag is used just once, then a paper bag must be used three times to compensate for the larger amount of carbon used in manufacturing and transporting it, a plastic “bag for life” must be used four times, and a cotton bag must be used 131 times.

Paper bags have been the traditional shopping bag of choice in the US, but while these biodegrade in landfill, the UK Environment Agency study points out that they have a higher carbon footprint than standard plastic carrier bags. It also says the available evidence suggests paper bags are not generally reused, either as bin liners – a purpose for which they are not well suited – or for other purposes.

Source: BBC News

Image: Packaging Innovations