North Korea’s Long-Range Missile Fails After Liftoff

Defying international pressure, North Korea launched a long-range missile Friday morning. However, U.S. officials say they believe the attempted launch failed before the missile was able to leave the Earth’s atmosphere.

U.S. officials confirm that a North Korean long-range missile appears to have broken apart midair after launch. Officials say they believe the missile fell apart within the Earth’s atmosphere before crashing into the sea. South Korea’s Defense Ministry first reported the launch, which is seen as defying international warnings and widely viewed as a provocation from the rogue state. The U.N. Security Council will meet Friday to discuss a response to the North’s attempted launch.


South Korean and U.S. intelligence reports say the launch was made from the west coast launch pad in the hamlet of Tongchang-ri. The launch comes after weeks of speculation regarding the possible launch, which North Korea’s government says was being done to send a weather satellite into orbit. If true, it would represent the third failed attempt by North Korea to send a satellite into space since 1998.

North Korea says it was timing the launch to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the birth of the country’s former leader, Kim Il Sung, which they are celebrating Sunday. However, most observers say the launch is actually tied to the country’s missile program. Japan has already given its military clearance to shoot down the rocket if it crosses into Japanese airspace.

There was no word from North Korea’s capital, Pyongyang, about the launch. North Korean television was reportedly broadcasting popular folk music at the time of the launch and has only said it will offer an announcement on the launch “soon.”

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Times 24/7

Microsoft Launches Windows 8 OS Preview

Microsoft has launched the preview edition of its next consumer operating system (OS), Windows 8.

From today users of Windows 7 will be able totry out the “reimagined” software ahead of its full release. The company calls it the most significant redesign of the Windows interface since its groundbreaking Windows 95 OS. The system’s design draws heavily on the “Metro” interface utilised on the current Windows Phone platform. The Windows 8 developer preview launched late last year and has been downloaded more than three million times.

Windows president Steven Sinofsky said more than 100,000 changes had been made since the developer version went public. For the first time since its inception, the trademark Windows “Start” button will no longer appear – instead being replaced by a sliding panel-based menu.


The OS is Microsoft’s attempt at combining a shared look and feel for smartphones, tablets and desktop computers – mirroring similar approaches from key competitors Apple and Google. The slide interface is paired with a more traditional-looking Windows layout to allow familiar use of programs such as Excel and Word.

“Windows 8 is a generational change in the Windows operating system,” said Mr Sinofsky at the launch event, held at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. ”Apps bring to life the operating system. The more apps you have, the better your experience.” A release date for the finished version of Windows 8 has not yet been announced.

Source: Digg

Image: Venture Beat