Chagas Tropical Disease — The New AIDS?

Chagas, a tropical disease spread by insects, is causing some fresh concern following an editorial—published earlier this week in a medical journal—that called it “the new AIDS of the Americas.” More than 8 million people have been infected by Chagas, most of them in Latin and Central America. But more than 300,000 live in the United States.

The editorial, published by the Public Library of Science’s Neglected Tropical Diseases, said the spread of the disease is reminiscent of the early years of HIV. Both diseases disproportionately affect people living in poverty, both are chronic conditions requiring prolonged, expensive treatment, and as with patients in the first two decades of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, “most patients with Chagas disease do not have access to health care facilities.” Unlike HIV, Chagas is not a sexually-transmitted disease; it’s “caused by parasites transmitted to humans by blood-sucking insects,” as the New York Times put it.


“It likes to bite you on the face,” CNN reported. “It’s called the kissing bug. When it ingests your blood, it excretes the parasite at the same time. When you wake up and scratch the itch, the parasite moves into the wound and you’re infected.”

Chagas, also known as American trypanosomiasis, kills about 20,000 people per year, the journal said. And while just 20 percent of those infected with Chagas develop a life-threatening form of the disease, Chagas is “hard or impossible to cure,” the Times reports.

“The problem is once the heart symptoms start, which is the most dreaded complication—the Chagas cardiomyopathy—the medicines no longer work very well,” Dr. Peter Hotez, a researcher at Baylor College of Medicine and one of the editorial’s authors, told CNN. “Problem No. 2: the medicines are extremely toxic.”

What do you think should the American government do to curb the spread of this disease? Share your opinions with us!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: The New York Times

Listeria-infected Cantaloupes Kill 4

A melon farm in Arkansas Valley of Colorado has issued a voluntary recall of its cantaloupes after a Listeria outbreak killed 4 and sickened 16 people from different states in the U.S.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the deaths from the Listeria outbreak were from Colorado and New Mexico. State health departments said more deaths could be confirmed when they get the results of the testing.

The CDC also named the states where the 22 people were infected: Colorado, Indiana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and West Virginia. [Read more...]