Photo Of Bedridden WWII Veteran Casting Vote Captures Hearts

Photo Of Bedridden WWII Veteran Casting Vote Captures HeartsA photograph of a 93-year-old Second World War veteran casting what will likely be his last ballot has captured the hearts of tens of thousands of Internet users.

‘True patriotism’

The photo shows Frank Tanabe lying in a hospital bed at home as his daughter Barbara Tanabe helps him fill out his absentee ballot. A half-million people saw the picture on the Reddit after his grandson posted it there on Thursday, making it one of the most popular items on the social media network for a day after.

“True Patriotism,” was the top rated comment on the post. “This is America. Amen,” was next, followed by “Thank you, Citizen.”

Doctors diagnosed Tanabe with an inoperable cancer tumour in his liver two months ago. He’s been in hospice care for the past three weeks at his daughter’s home. His condition has been deteriorating, and he’s been speaking little lately. He’s been determined to vote regardless, eagerly asking when the ballot would be arriving in the mail, his daughter said.


‘Encouraged others to vote’

Barbara Tanabe read aloud the names of the candidates to her dad. He either nodded “yes” to the names or shook his head “no.” She filled in the boxes on his behalf, following his instructions even when he didn’t pick the people she wanted.

Noah Tanabe, the grandson who posted the photo online, said he thinks about his grandfather every time he votes. The family has been surprised and gratified by the online comments on the photo, Barbara Tanabe said. She said her father, a quiet, unassuming man, would wonder what the fuss over the photo was about. But he’d be thrilled it encouraged others to vote, she said.

Did Frank Tanabe’s photo touch your heart? Tell us — who are you going to vote for?

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Winnipeg Free Press

A Single Drug For All Cancers?

A single drug can shrink or cure human breast, ovary, colon, bladder, brain, liver, and prostate tumors that have been transplanted into mice, researchers have found. The treatment, an antibody that blocks a “do not eat” signal normally displayed on tumor cells, coaxes the immune system to destroy the cancer cells.

A decade ago, biologist Irving Weissman of the Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California, discovered that leukemia cells produce higher levels of a protein called CD47 than do healthy cells. CD47, he and other scientists found, is also displayed on healthy blood cells; it’s a marker that blocks the immune system from destroying them as they circulate. Cancers take advantage of this flag to trick the immune system into ignoring them.


In the past few years, Weissman’s lab showed that blocking CD47 with an antibody cured some cases of lymphomas and leukemias in mice by stimulating the immune system to recognize the cancer cells as invaders. Now, he and colleagues have shown that the CD47-blocking antibody may have a far wider impact than just blood cancers. ”We showed that even after the tumor has taken hold, the antibody can either cure the tumor or slow its growth and prevent metastasis,” says Weissman.

Cancer researcher Tyler Jacks of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge says that although the new study is promising, more research is needed to see whether the results hold true in humans.

Weissman’s team has received a $20 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to move the findings from mouse studies to human safety tests. “We have enough data already,” says Weissman, “that I can say I’m confident that this will move to phase I human trials.”

Source: Digg

Image: Topic Pls