Windows 8’s Impressive Interface

The PC needs saving. With Windows 8, Microsoft believes it has the magic cure.

Beautifully designed apps, ultra-simple navigation, and instinctive commands make it hard to believe Metro came from the same company that brought us Windows Vista. Interactive, “live” tiles and an intuitive app store simplify the PC. Windows 8 is as easy to use as the iPad. That’s exactly what Microsoft intended. As PC sales slump amid a surge in tablets (okay, iPads), Microsoft is creating an operating system that lets hardware makers reimagine the PC for a tablet world. The software is slated to go on sale later this year.

But let’s be clear: Under the veneer of its redesign, Windows 8 is still very much a PC operating system. It features the familiar desktop and taskbar you’ve learned to love — or hate — over the years, and it works just as well with a keyboard and mouse as it does with a touchscreen.


The iPad is the simplest entry point to what Apple calls the “post-PC” world, but PCs haven’t outlived their usefulness just yet. Most people still go to their PCs for tools like Microsoft Office and more complex content creation tasks. That’s where Microsoft sees uncharted territory.

Metro is ideal for everyday tasks like Web browsing, e-mail, photo sharing, social networking, and casual gaming. But when you need to manage files, edit a document, or do anything else you wouldn’t typically try on an iPad, a tap or click on the desktop app launches what looks and feels like the Windows 7 interface.

Source: CNN

Image: Gizmo Watch

New Winged Roller Coaster Rips Limbs from Test Dummies

A theme park in London is set to debut a powerful new winged roller coaster this month, but only after first figuring out how not to dismember its riders. Time reports that Thorpe Park has been conducting test runs of its new coaster, the Swarm, even enlisting fighter pilots who described the ride as “gut-wrenching.”

The self-described “flight through apocalyptic devastation on Europe’s tallest winged rollercoaster” propels up to 28 riders at a time with their arms and legs dangling freely at 62 miles per hour and includes trips through an inverted 127-foot drop and several close encounters with walled structures that are designed to make passengers feel like they are about to crash.


The ride’s designers ran some test runs with crash test dummies, leaving many shocked when the dummies returned from the experience missing arms and legs. A team of former British fighter pilots were then brought in as the coaster’s preparation neared completion. Mark Cutmore, team leader of the Blades, a stunt pilot organization, told the Metro: “I am a self-confessed adrenaline junkie, but even as a pilot used to G-force there were some gut-wrenching moments, and I have to admit the near miss element is eye-watering — you really do feel as if you are going to crash into the structures.”

You can watch a simulated video of the Swarm here:

Winged roller coasters have been gaining popularity in recent years, but may be trumped by one California designer’s plans to create the world’s first “zero-gravity” coaster, which would imitate the simulators that NASA uses to train its astronauts.

Source: Yahoo News

Image: AOL