How To Tell If You’re A Shopaholic

It’s one thing to surrender to the occasional impulse buy — but when your purchases shift from impulsive to compulsive, it’s the first sign that you might be grappling with a more serious condition: a shopping addiction. Are you or a loved one a shopaholic? Here are five signs of a potential problem.

1. You often purchase things you don’t need or didn’t plan to buy

You’re easily tempted by items that you can do without. You’re particularly vulnerable if you’ve admitted to having an “obsession,” like shoes or designer handbags.

2. An argument or frustration sparks an urge to shop

Compulsive shopping is an attempt to fill an emotional void, like loneliness, lack of control, or lack of self-confidence. Shopaholics also have a tendency to suffer from mood disorders, eating disorders, or substance abuse problems.

3. You experience a rush of excitement when you buy

Experts say dopamine, a brain chemical associated with pleasure, is often released in waves as shoppers see a desirable item and consider buying it. This burst of excitement can become addictive.


4. You try to conceal your shopping habits

If you’re hiding shopping bags in your daughter’s closet or constantly looking over your shoulder for passing co-workers as you shop online, this is a possible sign that you’re spending money at the expense of your family, your loved ones, or even your job.

5. You feel anxious on the days you don’t shop

It’s one thing to feel anxious if you haven’t had your morning cup of joe, but if you’re feeling on edge because you haven’t swiped your debit card all day, be concerned.

If the characteristics above sound a lot like you or someone you know, don’t worry just yet. And if you’re on the fence about whether you really have a problem, even figuring out why you’re always shopping and how you can change could be a big relief – for both your well-being and your budget.

Are you a shopaholic? How do you control your unnecessary buying urges?

Source: Yahoo News

Image: 4Tnz

Can Spanking Lead To Mental Illness?

Although the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) strongly discourages spanking, at least half of parents admit to physically punishing their children. A new study published in the journal Pediatrics may cause parents to think more carefully before laying a hand on their little ones.

Researchers examined data from more than 34,000 adults and found that being spanked significantly increased the risk of developing mental health issues as adults. According to their results, corporal punishment is associated with mood disorders, including depression and anxiety, as well as personality disorders and alcohol and drug abuse. They estimate that as much as 7 percent of adult mental illness may be attributable to childhood physical punishment, including slapping, shoving, grabbing, and hitting. The study reports that spanking ups the risk of major depression by 41 percent, alcohol and drug abuse by 59 percent, and mania by 93 percent, among other findings.


“We’re not talking about just a tap on the bum,” study author Tracie Afifi, PhD, of the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, explained in a statement. “We were looking at people who used physical punishment as a regular means to discipline their children.” However, the analysis excluded individuals who reported more severe maltreatment such as physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect, emotional neglect, or exposure to intimate partner violence.

The physical punishment of children is legal in the United States, although it is banned in at least 24 other countries. It’s worth noting that 19 states also allow corporal punishment in schools. Earlier studies have linked spanking toddlers to increased aggression in older children. Spare the rod, spare the child?

Have you been spanked as a child? Do you agree with this study or do you think that spanking should still be implemented as a form of discipline?

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Parent Dish