And The Happiest States In The U.S. Are…

And The Happiest States In The U.S. Are...If you’re sick of cheerful, happy people, it might be wise to avoid Hawaii or Napa, California. They were found to be the United States’ happiest state and city, respectively, in a recent study of geotagged tweets.

‘Fondness for profanity’

Researchers at the University of Vermont sifted through more than 10 million geotagged tweets from 2011 to map out the moods of Americans in urban areas. They ranked the locations based on frequency of positive and negative words using the Mechanical Turk Language Assessment word list.

Maine, Nevada, Utah and Vermont round-out the top five happiest states list, following rainbow and beach-filled Hawaii. Louisiana was found to be the saddest state, followed by Mississippi, Maryland, Michigan and Delaware. One reason for Louisiana’s low cheeriness ranking (they must not have measured during Mardi Gras) is its inhabitants’ fondness for profanity.

‘Coastal areas were more chipper’

The study, which was broken down by The Atlantic, also looked at the results for 373 urban areas to rank the happiest and least-happy cities. Vacation destination Napa, California, was determined to be one of the happiest cities along with Longmont, Colorado; San Clemente, California; Santa Fe, New Mexico; and Santa Cruz, California.

The five most bummed-out cities according to average word choices were Beaumont, Texas; Albany, Georgia; Texas City, Texas; Shreveport, Louisiana; and Monroe, Louisiana. Again, researchers found liberal use of swear words to be a key factor in a city’s overall happiness score. Coastal areas were more chipper than landlocked areas, and the cities with a higher density of tweets tended to be less happy.

The research shows that social networks have a lot of promise for these types of surveys, and also that there are still some major limitations. Researchers point out that only 15% of online adults are using Twitter, and those users don’t accurately represent the demographics of the United States.

Do you agree with the results of this study? Tell us what makes you happy and what makes you sad.

Source: Heather Kelly, CNN

Image: The Telegraph

‘Miserable Monday’ Myth Debunked

We may say we hate Mondays, but research suggests Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays are equally loathed.

US investigators who looked at a poll of 340,000 people found moods were no worse on Mondays than other working days, bar Friday. People were happier as they approached the weekend, lending support for the concept of “that Friday feeling”. The report authors told the Journal of Positive Psychology that the concept of miserable Mondays should be ditched.

Prof Arthur Stone of Stony Brook University said: “Despite our global beliefs about lousy Mondays, we conclude that this belief should be abandoned. Similarly, claims that the Monday of the last full week of January – dubbed “blue Monday” – is the most depressing of the whole year have been debunked by others.


Prof Stone’s team analysed data collected by Gallup from telephone interviews. People reported more enjoyment and happiness and less stress or worry on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays compared with the rest of the week. Prof Stone says it is the contrast in mood from Sunday to Monday that has led to Mondays being unfairly singled out.

Do you agree with this study? What is your most/least favorite day of the week? Tell us how the “Miserable Monday” mentality affects your work attitude. Share your opinions in the comment box below!

Source: BBC News

Image: Chubby Beavers