Egyptian Christians Gather To Worship After Muslim Brotherhood Destroys Churches

Egyptian Christians Gather To Worship After Muslim Brotherhood Destroys ChurchesCopts whose church was one of dozens destroyed by Muslim Brotherhood supporters have returned to the charred house of worship, with their pastor vowing the violence suffered by his flock will make them “better Christians.”

‘Ethnic cleansing’

Across Egypt, at least 60 churches have been targeted, along with Christian schools, homes, businesses and even an orphanage, according to conservative estimates. In the areas of Minya, Beni Suef, Fayoum and Assiut, Christian homes and businesses have received leaflets warning them to leave or face reprisals by Islamists, Christians said.

As violence envelops Egypt, Christians are paying a heavy price with scores of their most sacred buildings and monuments being systematically destroyed by members of the Muslim Brotherhood in what one Coptic leader called an attempt at ethnic cleansing.


‘Path toward Islamist rule’

The group, which is clashing with the military throughout the North African nation, has zeroed in on Christians since the Muslim Brotherhood-backed administration of Mohamed Morsi was ousted on July 3. The military removed him from power after he imposed several sweeping constitutional changes that appeared to put the nation of 90 million on a path toward Islamist rule.

Under fire, Christians are solidly backing the military’s harsh crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood.

How will Egypt achieve true peace and order in this situation? Do you think Egyptian Christians should leave for their own safety?

Source: Fox News

Image: Coptic World

Egypt Declares State Of Emergency After Bloody Revolution Leaves 278 Dead

Egypt Declares State Of Emergency After Bloody Revolution Leaves 278 DeadEgypt, including its capital Cairo, teetered on the edge early Thursday as clashes persisted following the bloodiest day since the revolution two years ago that was envisioned to bring peace and democracy to Egypt — but has not.

‘Unrest’

The violence Wednesday pitted Egypt’s military and current government against backers of deposed President Mohamed Morsy, though others also were caught in the fray. At least 278 people were killed, including 235 civilians, state TV reported, citing an Egyptian emergency official. Interim Interior Minister Gen. Mohammed Ibrahim said that an additional 43 police officers died.

The intensity and violence lingered into Thursday morning, when state TV reported Morsy backers were attacking police stations, hospitals and government buildings despite a government-mandated curfew. More Egyptian troops were being deployed at entrances to Cairo and Giza, with the unrest prompting the closure Thursday of banks and the nation’s stock market.


‘Ensure stability’

The 2011 revolution that led to the ouster of Hosni Mubarak, who’d kept a firm grip on power for 30 years, was followed by Egypt’s first democratic elections. Morsy — a leader of the Islamist group the Muslim Brotherhood — won the presidency in that 2012 vote, but was forced out by the military last month.

The government on Wednesday, according to state TV, issued a month-long state of emergency. This a loaded term in Egypt, given that Mubarak long ruled under such a decree that barred unauthorized assembly, restricted freedom of speech and let police jail people indefinitely. The prime minister said the government felt compelled to act to ensure stability, praising security forces for their “calm” and claiming some activists had intent to undermine the government.

What will it take to calm down the situation in Egypt? Can Egypt still achieve true democracy? Feel free to share your thoughts and opinions with us!

Source: Greg Botelho. Josh Levs and Ian Lee | CNN

Image: ABC 30