Analysis: Young People Are More Narcissistic Than Ever

Analysis Young People Are More Narcissistic Than EverA new analysis of the American Freshman Survey, which has accumulated data for the past 47 years from 9 million young adults, reveals that college students are more likely than ever to call themselves gifted and driven to succeed, even though their test scores and time spent studying are decreasing.

‘Incredible self-involvement’

Psychologist Jean Twenge, the lead author of the analysis, is also the author of a study showing that the tendency toward narcissism in students is up 30 percent in the last thirty-odd years.

On Facebook, young people can fool themselves into thinking they have hundreds or thousands of “friends.” They can choose to show the world only flattering, sexy or funny photographs of themselves. Using Twitter, young people can pretend they are worth “following,” as though they have real-life fans. Using computer games, our sons and daughters can pretend they are Olympians, Formula 1 drivers, rock stars or sharpshooters.  On MTV and other networks, young people can see lives just like theirs portrayed on reality TV shows fueled by such incredible self-involvement and self-love that any of the “real-life” characters should really be in psychotherapy to have any chance at anything like a normal life.


‘Greatest epidemic’

All the while, these adolescents, teens and young adults are watching a Congress that can’t control its manic, euphoric, narcissistic spending, a president that can’t see his way through to applauding genuine and extraordinary achievements in business, a society that blames mass killings on guns, not the psychotic people who wield them, and—here no surprise—a stock market that keeps rising and falling like a roller coaster as bubbles inflate and then, inevitably, burst.

We had better get a plan together to combat this greatest epidemic as it takes shape.  Because it will dwarf the toll of any epidemic we have ever known. And it will be the hardest to defeat. Because, by the time we see the scope and destructiveness of this enemy clearly, we will also realize, as the saying goes, that it is us.

Do you agree that the youth of today’s generation are more narcissistic than ever? Share your thoughts and opinions with us!

Source: Dr. Keith Ablow, Fox News

Image: Under 30 CEO

Child Psychopaths — Are They Real?

The groundbreaking HBO documentary “Child of Rage” years ago showed how horrific abuse and neglect could turn a child into a psychopath. But what about the kids who aren’t abused? What about the ones who, for no discernible reason, do horrible things to other people?

Experts are divided about whether it’s right to label a child as a psychopath. On the one hand, their brains are still developing; since psychopathy is largely considered untreatable, such a label would carry a heavy, life-altering stigma. On the other hand, identifying “callous-unemotional” children early could allow for successful treatment — or at least a heads-up to society.

But reaching such a diagnosis can be tricky. Certain tendencies, like narcissism and impulsiveness, that are obvious signs of a psychopath are also part and parcel of childhood. And callous-unemotional kids are often extremely intelligent; they’re able to lie and manipulate without remorse, making it harder to understand what they’re doing and why.


In “Child of Rage,” 6-year-old Beth opens her blue eyes wide and calmly tells her psychiatrist how she’d like to hurt, and even kill, her adoptive parents — a Baptist preacher and his wife — and her biological brother. She’s calm and conversational as she describes how she has deliberately harmed and killed animals, how she drives pins into her brother and sexually molests him, how she repeatedly slammed his head into a cement floor and only stopped because someone caught her.

Beth suffered extreme physical and sexual abuse and neglect by her biological parents, which experts say could explain her detached, calculating demeanor and her lack of “a sense of conscience.” But some other “kid psychopaths” seem to have grown up surrounded by love and affection.

Some experts say that psychopathy, like other mental illnesses, may have a genetic component; others think that it is a neurological condition all its own, like autism is, though it’s not part of the autism spectrum. Though some psychologists believe one can start seeing psychopathic traits as early as age 5, there is not yet a definitive test for children that young.

In your opinion, is it nature or nurture that pushes a child to become a psychopath? Voice out!

Source: Yahoo News

Image: Parent 24