Court Overturns Illinois Ban On Concealed Weapons

Court Overturns Illinois Ban On Concealed WeaponsIn a victory for gun rights advocates, a federal appeals court on Tuesday struck down Illinois’ ban on carrying concealed weapons — the only total concealed-carry ban in the country. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals gave state lawmakers six months to come up with their own version of the law that legalizes concealed carry.

‘Self-defense’

“We’re extremely pleased with the ruling,” Illinois State Rifle Association leader Richard Pearson said. “Now that the court has ruled … we will work as soon as possible with legislators to craft a concealed-carry bill for the state of Illinois.”

The 2-1 decision marks a huge win for gun rights advocates who have argued that the ban on concealed weapons violates the U.S. Constitution’s Second Amendment and what they see as citizens’ right to carry guns for self-defense.  A new law could be in place by January, Pearson said. A bill has already been written by Rep. Brandon Phelps that includes background checks, field provisions and other issues.


‘Strict gun control laws’

The appeals court ruling reverses lower court opinions against a lawsuit filed by former corrections officer Michael Moore of Champaign, farmer Charles Hooks of Percy in southeastern Illinois and the Bellevue, Wash.-based Second Amendment Foundation.

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, who favors strict gun control laws and proposed an assault weapons ban earlier this year that lawmakers defeated, has vowed to again bring legislation that would prohibit the sale or possession of semi-automatic rifles and other guns. Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s office, which is responsible for defending the state’s laws, said it was reviewing the ruling and would comment later Tuesday.

Are you in favor of the Federal court’s decision to strike down the Illinois ban on carrying concealed weapons? What is your stand regarding gun ownership?

Source: Fox News

Image: CBS News

U.K. Government to Start Monitoring Email and Web Usage

The government will be able to monitor the calls, emails, texts and visits of everyone in the UK under new legislation set to be announced soon. Internet firms will be required to give intelligence agency GCHQ access to communications on demand, in real time.

The Home Office says the move is key to tackling crime and terrorism, but civil liberties groups have criticised it. Tory MP David Davis called it “an unnecessary extension of the ability of the state to snoop on ordinary people”. Attempts by the last Labour government to take similar steps failed after huge opposition, including from the Tories.

A new law – which may be announced in the forthcoming Queen’s Speech in May – would not allow GCHQ to access the content of emails, calls or messages without a warrant. But it would enable intelligence officers to identify who an individual or group is in contact with, how often and for how long. They would also be able to see which websites someone had visited. In a statement, the Home Office said action was needed to “maintain the continued availability of communications data as technology changes”.


Even if the move is announced in the Queen’s Speech, any new law would still have to make it through Parliament, potentially in the face of opposition in both the Commons and the Lords. The previous Labour government attempted to introduce a central, government-run database of everyone’s phone calls and emails, but eventually dropped the bid after widespread anger.

Chris Huhne, then the Lib Dem home affairs spokesman, said any legislation requiring communications providers to keep records of contact would need “strong safeguards on access”, and “a careful balance” would have to be struck “between investigative powers and the right to privacy”.

Source: BBC News

Image: A1 Social