Is Texting An Adequate Substitute For Talking?

Is Texting An Adequate Substitute For TalkingI get it. We are living in a modern world with advanced technology, complicated gadgets, and bizarre communication techniques. This is a world where conversations are often conducted in front of the computer screen, where dates can be done online, where emoticons are deemed sufficient as expressions, where people can say more when texting rather than in person. But is texting an adequate substitute for a face-to-face talk?

‘Impersonal’

We have heard of marriage proposals over Twitter, asking out a prospective date through YouTube, and even informing about a divorce decision via text message. Whether it be a good or bad news that you are delivering, can an obscure gadget cushion the blow of that news? Can it dull the ache of a breakup? Does it make a joyous birthday greeting less lively? Does it make an “I love you” more impersonal?

I do not have the answer to all these questions. But I can give my opinion about it. Opinions, rather. Lots of it.


‘Human touch’

I do know that I would love to look into the eyes of my beloved while hearing the words “I love you.” I would love tohug my son first thing in the morning to greet him on his natal day.  I can hold the hand of a grieving friend while expressing my condolences. I love to see the animated expressions of my parents whenever we talk about events spontaneously. I can appreciate the awed silence with my travel buddies while we look at the magnificent view infront of us.

You see, there is a reason why most things are better said in person — human touch, I believe. With that mingled with genuine facial expressions and spontaneous words, you know that once is being sincere with his feelings. Humans, after all, are complicated creatures. We need a variety of emotions to be truly called human.

Perhaps, then, texting is not and can never be an adequate substitute for talking. Would you agree with me? Or would you rather type “I do” on your cellphone on the day of your wedding?

Image: Digital Trends

Microsoft Reverses Controversial Xbox One Sharing Policies

Microsoft Reverses Controversial Xbox One Sharing PoliciesReacting to “feedback from the Xbox community,” Microsoft is appearing to reverse course and change two key components to policies for its new Xbox One video game console.

‘Second thoughts’

All disc-based games can be played without ever connecting online, and the 24-hour connection requirement has been dropped, according to an update to a May post concerning questions about the new device, due to be released this fall. Additionally, there will be no limitations to using and sharing games, Don Mattrick, president of the Interactive Entertainment Business division, says in the post. People will be able to share, trade or resell their games in the same way they do for Xbox 360 games.

The changes indicate Microsoft is having second thoughts about some of its future plans with the Xbox One.

The post read, “Update on June 19, 2013: As a result of feedback from the Xbox community, we have changed certain policies for Xbox One reflected in this blog. Some of this information is no longer accurate.”


‘Restrictions’

The company has been taking a public berating since it announced restrictions to used games and their requirement for an Internet connection. Consumers have been reacting with anger over the policies, but the tipping point may have been when Jimmy Fallon, host of NBC’s “Late Night,” pointed out that only the PlayStation 4 could freely play used games, which created more confusion.

The flogging became worse when Sony took to the stage at this year’s Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) trade show and pointedly did not include such restrictions for the new PlayStation 4. A YouTube video produced by Sony made fun of the used-game restriction by showing how people could share games on the PlayStation 4 — by just handing them to another person.

Did Microsoft make a good decision when they reversed their Xbox One sharing policies? Which game console do you prefer — Xbox One or PlayStation 4?

Source: Larry Frum | CNN

Image: Yahoo News