Top 5 Signs That You Need to Quit Your Job

You probably think I’m crazy for writing about signs it’s time to quit your job when the economy is so volatile, but your health and happiness are far more important than a paycheck.  Here are 5 signs it’s time to quit your job.

YOUR APPEARANCE HAS CHANGED. If you’ve gained or lost a significant amount of weight, wake up with dark circles or bags under your eyes or just don’t care about your appearance anymore due to stress from your job, it’s a serious indicator that it’s time to move on.

YOU FEEL STAGNANT. If your workplace doesn’t offer any opportunity to learn new things or promote, it’s a definite sign it’s time to quit your job. If you’re currently at a job that isn’t in line with your plans, think about what you can do to get you closer to your goal.

YOU’RE OBSESSED WITH JOB SEARCHING. We all like to keep our options open when it comes to jobs, but if you are constantly online at work looking for open positions and updating your resume and cover letter, it’s time to go!


YOU DREAD GOING TO WORK EVERYDAY. If you’re having physical or emotional reactions to going in to work, it’s very unhealthy and time to call the doctor and update the old resume.

YOUR WORKPLACE ISN’T FARING WELL. When you start seeing reduction of benefits and bonuses, downsizing and high turnovers in corporate, it’s safe to say that it’s time to move on from your job.

Did you find yourself agreeing to at least 3 of these signs it’s time to quit your job? If so, don’t get discouraged. Even though we are in a bad economy, all hope is not lost; you have other options!

Source: All Women’s Talk

Image: Dr. Jack Singer

How Do We Solve the Plastic Bag Problem?

The European Commission is to publish proposals in the spring designed to reduce the number of plastic bags used in Europe each year. Most of the 15,000 people who took part in a public consultation favoured an outright ban – but what are the options?

Last year Italy became the first country in Europe to ban non-biodegradable single-use plastic bags. A number of countries have banned very thin plastic bags, including China, South Africa, Kenya, Uganda and Bangladesh – in Bangladesh’s case, it was found that the bags had clogged up the drainage system, exacerbating deadly floods.

The Republic of Ireland introduced a charge of 15 euro cents (12p, 20 US cents) per bag in March 2002, which led to a 95% reduction in plastic bag litter. Belgium, Germany, Spain, Norway and the Netherlands are among the countries following Ireland’s lead.


If shoppers stop using plastic bags, they must start using other kinds of bags, but there is no perfect solution. Stronger, heavier bags, whether made of fabric or plastic, have a bigger environmental impact than standard supermarket shopping bags. For instance, if a plastic bag is used just once, then a paper bag must be used three times to compensate for the larger amount of carbon used in manufacturing and transporting it, a plastic “bag for life” must be used four times, and a cotton bag must be used 131 times.

Paper bags have been the traditional shopping bag of choice in the US, but while these biodegrade in landfill, the UK Environment Agency study points out that they have a higher carbon footprint than standard plastic carrier bags. It also says the available evidence suggests paper bags are not generally reused, either as bin liners – a purpose for which they are not well suited – or for other purposes.

Source: BBC News

Image: Packaging Innovations