Does the Caramel Coloring in Colas Cause Cancer?

Lab tests commissioned by a consumer group find that popular colas — including Coke and Pepsi — carry a caramel-coloring chemical that causes cancer in lab animals.

The chemical, 4-methylimidazole or 4-MI, comes from the sodas’ caramel coloring. That color is made not from natural caramel but via a chemical process involving ammonia. While toxicology studies show that 4-MI can cause cancer in lab animals, it’s not clear whether it’s a human carcinogen — or whether the amounts detected in sodas pose any kind of a threat.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) in February 2011 petitioned the FDA to ban this kind of caramel coloring. It also wanted the cosmetic additive renamed “chemically modified caramel coloring” or “ammonia-sulfite process caramel coloring.”


The CSPI-commissioned tests detected 4-MI in regular and diet Coca-Cola and Pepsi products — in millionths of a gram per 12-ounce can. CSPI notes that these quantities are several times higher than a controversial benchmark set by the state of California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. While the CSPI suggests that 4-MI is causing cancer in thousands of Americans who drink a lot of cola, the FDA says few people should worry.

“A consumer would have to consume well over a thousand cans of soda a day to reach the doses administered in the studies that have shown links to cancer in rodents,” the FDA tells WebMD. And while it believes 4-MI is a threat, the CSPI says it’s less of a threat than the obesity-promoting high-fructose corn syrup in soft drinks.

Source: Web MD

Image: WellBeing

Pepsi: Mountain Dew Can Turn Mouse Into Jelly

Pepsi Co., facing a lawsuit from a man who claims to have found a mouse in his Mountain Dew can, has an especially creative, if disgusting, defense: their soda would have dissolved a dead mouse before the man could have found it.

An Illinois man sued Pepsi in 2009 after he claims he “spat out  the soda to reveal a dead mouse,” the Madison County Record reports. He claims he sent the mouse to Pepsi, which then “destroyed” the remains after he allowed them to test it, according to his complaint. Most shudder-worthy, however, is that Pepsi’s lawyers also found experts to testify, “the mouse would have dissolved in the soda had it been in the can from the time of its bottling until the day the plaintiff drank it,” according to the Record.

This seems like a winning-the-battle-while-surrendering-the-war kind of strategy that hinges on winning the argument that “our product is essentially a can of battery acid.”

The lawyers still appear to be lawyering behind the scenes but we cannot wait for this to come to trial (though we think a trial is about as likely as the chances of us “Doing the Dew” again).

 

Source: Yahoo! News

Image: The Inquisitr