Ancient Egyptian Statue Mysteriously Spins On Its Own

Ancient Egyptian Statue Mysteriously Spins On Its OwnThe museum officials were stumped. A statue is supposed to stand still, not rotate all by itself. But this one at the Manchester Museum seemed to have done just that. Turned around 180 degrees — revealing an inscription on its back asking for beer.

‘Prayer for the deceased’

Statuette no. 9325 doesn’t appear to go by any proper name. It’s a prefabricated figure — an off-the-shelf product — that was placed into a small tomb around 1800 B.C. A private collector in Britain donated it to the museum in 1933. The inscription on the back, requesting a sacrifice of beer, bread and animals, was a standard prayer for the deceased.


‘Only moved during the day’

For decades, the figurine stood perfectly still — until museum workers moved its case a few feet from its original position. In February, curator Campbell Price noticed something curious was afoot. The statue seemed to have slightly turned. When he looked next, it was facing another direction. A day later, another. The turns were subtle. But at the end of each day, you could tell the statue was angled differently.

In April, museum officials installed a time-lapse camera that snapped an image of the statue every minute of every day for a week. When they ran the images in fast motion, they came across a surprising revelation: the statue only moved during the day, when visitors were walking past. It seemed, Price wrote, that vibrations caused by foot traffic in room was the culprit.

Do you find this statue movement mysterious or not? What other factors could have contributed to this occurrence?

Source: Ben Brumfield | CNN

Image: Peta Pixel

Baby Dies After Parents Opt For Prayer Over Medical Treatment

Baby Dies After Parents Opt For Prayer Over Medical TreatmentA couple serving probation for the 2009 death of their toddler after they turned to prayer instead of a doctor could face new charges now that another son has died.

‘Faith healing’

Herbert and Catherine Schaible belong to a fundamentalist Christian church that believes in faith healing. They lost their 8-month-old son, Brandon, last week after he suffered from diarrhea and breathing problems for at least a week, and stopped eating. Four years ago, another son died from bacterial pneumonia.

Prosecutors said Tuesday that a decision on charges will be made after they get the results of an autopsy. Catherine Schaible’s attorney, Mythri Jayaraman, cautioned against a rush to judgment, and said the couple are good parents deeply distraught over the loss of another child.

A jury convicted the Schaibles of involuntary manslaughter in the January 2009 death of their 2-year-old son, Kent. The boy’s symptoms had included coughing, congestion, crankiness and a loss of appetite. His parents said he was eating and drinking until the last day, and they had thought he was getting better. The Schaibles were sentenced to 10 years’ probation.


‘Forbidding Christians from visiting doctors’

At a hearing Monday, a judge told the couple they had violated the terms of their probation, noting the Schaibles had told investigators that they prayed to God to make Brandon well instead of seeking medical attention. Prosecutors on Monday sought to have the couple jailed, but Philadelphia Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner permitted them to remain free because their seven other children had been placed in foster care.

Herbert Schaible, 44, and his 43-year-old wife grew up in the First Century Gospel Church in northeast Philadelphia and have served as teachers there. The church’s website has a sermon titled “Healing — From God or Medicine?” that quotes Bible verses purportedly forbidding Christians from visiting doctors or taking medicine.

Would you opt for prayer over medical treatment if your child got sick? Should Herbert and Catherine Schaible be jailed for the death of their second child?

Source: Michael Rubinkam and Maryclaire Dale, Yahoo News

Image: ABC News